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Preparation of Aspirin.

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Introduction

Preparation of Aspirin Developed by German chemist Felix Hoffmann in 1897 as a treatment for his father's arthritis, the basic ingredients of aspirin had long been known. As long ago as the 500B.C, Hippocrates, the father of modern medicine, used ground willow bark to help pain. Willow bark contains salicin, the basis of a class of drugs called salicylates. One of the best known aromatic acetates is acetylsalicylic acid, or aspirin, which is prepared by the esterification of the phenolic hydroxyl group of salicylic acid. The key compound in the synthesis of aspirin, salicylic acid, is prepared from phenol by a process discovered over 100 years ago by the German chemist Hermann Kolbe. ...read more.

Middle

Ethanoylation of the phenolic group produces aspirin. Method; Safety glasses and protective gloves should be worn at all times as strong acid is being used and ethanoic anhydride is an irritant. Also special care must be taken when using ethanoic anhydride as it is flammable and should not be close to a flame or in high temperatures. Chemicals used; * 4cm3 of ethanoic anhydride * 2.0g of 2-hydroxybenzoic acid * 5 drops 85% Phospheric(v) acid * 42cm3 water Equipment; * safety glasses * gloves * pipette * burette * 100cm3 beaker * stirring rod * basin * ice * Suction filter * filter paper * kettle Method; Into a test tube, add 2g of 2-hydrobenzoic acid and 4cm3 of ethanoic anhydride. ...read more.

Conclusion

Allow the mixture to cool in an ice bath to complete crystallisation. Collect the product using suction filter and wash out with a little water. Purify the aspirin collected by dissolving in boiling water, re-crystallising in an ice bath, and then suction filter as before. The aspirin collected can be tested for purity by heating in capillary tubes and recording the melting point. Comparing this to the standard melting point helps to analyse the purity. Quantity on reagent required to produce a theoretical yield of 2g of aspirin; Yield / Mr of Aspirin = no. moles of aspirin needed. No. ...read more.

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