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Task 1: To determine the polarity of water, hexane and ethanol. Task 2: To find the solubility and conductivity of iodine, graphite and calcium chloride in the solvent used in task 1.To find the volatility of iodine, graphite and calcium chloride.

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Introduction

Chemistry Experiment Report 5 Wong Ka Ming (29) 6B 1. Object Task 1: To determine the polarity of water, hexane and ethanol. Task 2: To find the solubility and conductivity of iodine, graphite and calcium chloride in the solvent used in task 1.To find the volatility of iodine, graphite and calcium chloride. 2. Result The effect of a charged rod on liquid jets Water Hexane Ethanol Deflected towards the rod No effect Deflected towards the rod The miscibility of liquids Water and ethanol Water and hexane Hexane and ethanol Miscible Immiscible Miscible The solubility of iodine, graphite and calcium chloride Water Hexane Ethanol Iodine Relatively Insoluble Soluble Soluble Graphite Insoluble Insoluble Insoluble Calcium Chloride Soluble Insoluble Slightly Soluble The volatility of iodine, graphite and calcium chloride Iodine Graphite Calcium Chloride Very volatile Not volatile Volatile Conductivity Water Hexane Ethanol Pure state X X X Iodine X X Graphite Calcium Chloride 0.001A 0.2A 3. ...read more.

Middle

4. Discussion From the experiment 1, water and ethanol is deflected to the glass rod, It means that water and ethanol are polar liquids. Both water and ethanol have O-H bond which have a net dipole moments. When a positive charged rod is used, it is the negative ends of the dipoles in the polar molecules that are attracted towards the rod. With a negatively charged rod, the positive ends of the dipoles are attracts to it. In hexane, all the dipole moments are cancelled out and with zero resultant dipole moments, so hexane is a non-polar liquid. In experiment 2, water and ethanol are miscible, it is because both of them are polar liquids. Water and hexane are immiscible, because water is polar but hexane is non-polar. ...read more.

Conclusion

In experiment 4, graphite is insoluble in water, hexane and ethanol. Graphite has a layered giant covalent structure, the layers are held by weak van der Waal's forces. The giant covalent structure makes graphite insoluble in any solvent. Graphite has a high melting point due to the giant covalent structure, so that it is not volatile. Structure of graphite In experiment 5, calcium chloride is soluble in water and ethanol but not hexane. Calcium is an ionic compound. Ionic substances are soluble in polar solvent, e.g. water and ethanol, due to the attraction between the ion and the polar solvent molecule. They are insoluble in non-polar solvents. Although ionic compounds usually have a high boiling point, but calcium chloride carry covalent character, so that it has a low boiling point and it is volatile. Calcium chloride in water and ethanol conducts electricity in water because there are mobile ions. ...read more.

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