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The aim is to find the accurate concentration of sulphuric acid H2SO4 using titration with anhydrous sodium carbonate Na2CO3

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Introduction

Titration AIM: The aim is to find the accurate concentration of sulphuric acid H2SO4 using titration with anhydrous sodium carbonate Na2CO3 The following equation shows reaction (neutralisation) between sulphuric (VI) acid and sodium carbonate solution: Na2CO3 (aq) + H2SO4 (aq) Na2SO4 (aq) + CO2 (g) + H2O (l) This equation shows that one mole of sodium carbonate reacts with one mole of sulphuric (VI) acid. Therefore, they will always have the same number of moles when reacting with each other. We must follow the following steps to find the concentration of sulphuric acid: * We need to find the number of moles of sodium carbonate. We use the following formula to find the number of moles: Number of moles = the mass in gram/the molar mass = the mass/(23 X 2) ...read more.

Middle

2 Transfer the weighed sodium carbonate to a beaker and add 25 cm of distilled water to dissolve it completely and mix them. 3 After dissolving, transfer the solution to a 250 cm volumetric flask. Rinse the beaker thoroughly and transfer all the washes to the volumetric flask. Remember not to overshoot the graduation mark of the glass. 4 Make up the solution to the line on the neck by adding water. 5 Pipette 10 cm of sodium carbonate to a clean conical flask. 6 Add two drops of methyl orange indicator. 7 Fill up a 50 cm burette with sulphuric acid solution and add acid to the sodium carbonate in small volumes and swirl the flask after each addition. 8 Keep adding until you see the colour of sodium carbonate changes permanently. ...read more.

Conclusion

* The burette and the pipette should be washed out with the solutions being used. * The apparatus should be clean. * The end point of a titration can only be determined accurately if the acid from the burette is added drop by drop, with swirling, as the end point is reached. Risk assessment: * Lab coats should be worn during the experiment. * Eye protection should be worn. * Sulphuric acid causes severe burns. Solution equal to stronger than 1.5 M are corrosive. Solution equal to or stronger than 0.5 M but less than 1.5 M are irritant. If splashed in eyes, flood the eye with gently running tap water for 10 minutes. Seek medical attention. * Technicians must be informed if any spillage or breakage occur. * Hands must be washed after the experiment. Hassan Elumairi ...read more.

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