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The aim is to investigate which factor and or ingredient affects the height the dough will rise and make it rise the most. We'll accomplish this by adding different amounts of sugar, yeast or varying the heat to see what makes the dough rise the most.

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Introduction

ARIF 7-B 29/4/00 Science-Practical Investigation Making Bread Aim: The aim is to investigate which factor and or ingredient affects the height the dough will rise and make it rise the most. We'll accomplish this by adding different amounts of sugar, yeast or varying the heat to see what makes the dough rise the most. Factors: The main factors that we'll be investigating are: 1). The amount of sugar you put is one. The reason that it's a main factor is because the more sugar you put in the dough the more the dough will rise. The reason this happens is because during respiration sugar gets broken down to make carbon dioxide, that gets trapped in the dough, which makes the dough rise. So if you put more sugar, more carbon dioxide will be trapped and therefore the dough will rise even more. 2). The amount of yeast you put in the dough is also important and a main factor as the more yeast you put in the more breaking down the yeast cells can do the sugar. That will mean that there will be more carbon dioxide trapped so the dough will rise more. 3). The final important main factor is the amount of heat that you leave your dough in which to rise. ...read more.

Middle

5). Once the dough is a big chunk and golden brown in colour you divide that chunk into three parts to the experiment three times. The reason you do it three times is to double check and in case you went wrong anywhere. Now you've got one patch. 6). Now you have to make another patch repeating steps 2-5 only this time you add 20.00g of sugar instead of 10.00g. 7). Then you have to make another patch repeating steps 2-5 this time you have to add 30.00g of sugar. The reason that you keep on adding more sugar by 10.00g is because we're investigating whether if you add more sugar will the dough rise more. 8). Now that you've got 9 chunks of dough you roll all the chunks into thin sausage like rolls that can fit into the test tube, remembering to keep flour on your hands so it doesn't stick on. 9). When you've got nine sausages like rolls you put each one into a glass test tube. At this stage you have to know which is the 10.00g, 20.00g or 30.00g. An easy way to do this by putting all the 10.00g, 20.00g and 30.00g in three different beakers. 10). Once there in a test tube you take a permanent marker and mark on the tube where the tallest point of the dough is. ...read more.

Conclusion

To be absolutely 100% sure about my final conclusion, I should do the 30.00g trial 2 experiment again and do another experiment with 40.00g of sugar in the bread dough. My prediction for the 40.00g experiment is that the dough will rise by about 11-12cm as the dough rises by about 2cm when you add 10.00g of sugar more. I have to be careful that I leave the dough to rise the same time as I left the others to rise in or that can affect the height the dough rises as I have explained in the explanation. My experiments were generally fair as I used the same test tube, same amount of flour and yeast and the same type of sugar. My test wasn't totally fair as I did the 22nd trial of the 30.00g experiment on a different day as the others where the temperature could have been different and that affects the height as I've explained in the explanation. That's why I have to do a 40.00g experiment and a 30.00g experiment again. If I was to do the experiment again I would try to improve on doing all the experiments on the same day and I would try to leave the all the dough's for the same time. This time I would definitely try and make sure that the dough doesn't stick to the SIDES!! ...read more.

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