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The aim is to see how the temperature effects the rate of photosynthesis of Cabomba (tropical freshwater plant.)

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Introduction

Nicola Kellie: 4089 St.Josephs Horwich: 32159 Investigation to see how the temperature effects the rate of photosynthesis of Cabomba (tropical freshwater plant). Aim The aim is to see how the temperature effects the rate of photosynthesis of Cabomba (tropical freshwater plant.) Prediction I think that the amount of gas given off by Cabomba will increase as the temperature increases. The reaction for photosynthesis is: Light Water + Carbon Dioxide Oxygen + Glucose Chlorophyll I believe we will be putting more energy into the reaction as we increase the temperature, this means that more collisions will be caused between the water molecules and carbon dioxide. Also, the enzymes will have more chance of landing on an active site and they will move faster. ...read more.

Middle

But if the temperature is raised too much the enzyme will be destroyed. It is usually at 45 C that enzymes become denatured. This means they loose their specific shape. This means that the reactions will slow down because the enzymes can no longer accept the molecules. Variables The aim is to see how the temperature effects the photosynthesis of the comba so that is the variable we will be changing. We will be using temperatures of 10 C, 20 C, 30 C, 40 C, and 50 C. To keep it a fair test the variables that we will keep the same are: 1. Length of cabomba (3cm) ...read more.

Conclusion

3. Place petri dish on top of that. 4. Connect ray box to power pack at 9v. 5. Fill beaker with specific temperature of water up to 250ml (5-15 C). 6. Add either hotter or colder water to get it to the desired temperature, using a thermometer. 7. Cut a fresh piece of cabomba (3cm). Cut this under the water to stop any air bubbles, which could effect your experiment. 8. Clamp the beaker to stop any breakages. 9. Put the lead weight and funnel over the cabomba. 10. Fill the syringe with 2ml water making sure there are no air bubbles. 11. Place the syringe on the top of the funnel under water making sure there are no air bubbles. 12. Turn the light on and time it for 2minutes. 13. Repeat again twice for 10 C and repeat all steps for the different Temperatures. ...read more.

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