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To measure heat loss in two test tubes which represent bodies, one which sweats (the wet test tube) and one body which doesn't sweat (the dry test tube).

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Introduction

Biology Coursework: Sweaty Bodies Aim: To measure heat loss in two test tubes which represent bodies, one which sweats (the wet test tube) and one body which doesn't sweat (the dry test tube). Apparatus: 2 Thermometers 2 Stoppers 2 Boiling Tubes 2 Measuring Cylinders Cotton Wool Paper Towels Timer Water Previous Knowledge: I know that when the body gets to hot, the sweat glands produce sweat, which evaporates of the skins surface, and cools the body as it evaporates. The evaporation of water needs a lot of heat energy. This heat energy is taken from the body when the sweat evaporates. Prediction: I think that the wet test tube will cool the fastest because this is what happened during my preliminary experiment. The wet test tube cooled the water down by 22OC more than the dry test tube. Also my knowledge of the way the human body works helps support my prediction because the body produces sweat to cool the body down, and the wet test tube acts in the same way. Diagram: Fair Testing: For all the experiments I'm going to conduct I will have to make sure I do them fairly. ...read more.

Middle

2. I did this by pouring 25cm3 of boiling water in to a boiling tube covered in a wet paper towel and the taking the readings for 10 minutes because the most significant change in temperature occurs between 0 and 10 minutes in my preliminary experiment. 3. I then poured some more boiling water into a boiling tube covered by a dry paper towel. I waited for the temperature to drop so the starting temperature was the same as the starting temperature for the wet test tube. 4. I then took readings of this boiling tube for 10 minutes. Results: Time Temp. in dry Test tube (OC) Temp. in wet test tube (OC) 0 67 67 1 66 61 2 65 56 3 63 53 4 61 49 5 60 46 6 59 44 7 58 42 8 57 40 9 56 39 10 55 37 Calculations: The dry boiling tube cooled by 12OC, and the wet boiling tube cooled by 30OC. The wet boiling tube cooled 18OC more than the dry boiling tube. Plan: Experiment 3. 1. I decided use a stopper at the top of the boiling tube to plug it up. ...read more.

Conclusion

3. I then wet one of the boiling tubes, and took my second reading a minutes later. Results: Time Temp. in dry Test tube (OC) Temp. in wet test tube (OC) 0 63 63 1 62 55 2 60 50 3 60 48 4 58 46 5 57 45 6 56 42 7 55 41 8 55 40 9 54 38 10 53 37 Calculations: The dry boiling tube cooled by 10OC, and the wet boiling tube cooled by 26OC. The wet boiling tube cooled 16OC more than the dry boiling tube. Plan Experiment 6. 1. I did this experiment in exactly the same way I did experiment 5 because I thought that this was the most accurate method, so I wanted to make sure my results were accurate. Results: Time Temp. in dry Test tube (OC) Temp. in wet test tube (OC) 0 64 64 1 62 57 2 61 54 3 60 51 4 59 49 5 58 47 6 57 45 7 56 43 8 55 41 9 54 40 10 53 39 Calculations: The dry boiling tube cooled by 11OC, and the wet boiling tube cooled by 25OC. The wet boiling tube cooled 14OC more than the dry boiling tube. ...read more.

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Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

3 star(s)

This essay is not really a full write up of a practical but rather a discussion of preliminary tests.

It is a good example of how running prelims helps to design an experiment. It could be enhanced to include a summary of how the prelims resulted in the final design.

***

Marked by teacher Sam Morran 15/05/2013

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