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Why is swimming good for you?

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Introduction

Why is swimming good for you? Swimming is one of the few ways of getting exercise that improves your all-round fitness because it can boost strength, stamina and suppleness all at the same time. You can look at it as having all the cardiovascular benefits of running, but with some of the strength-building effects of weight training and some of the suppleness-promoting effects of dance classes. Swimming uses all the major muscle groups, and is a demanding aerobic exercise that helps to keep your heart and lungs healthy. Swimming also helps to keep your joints flexible, especially in the neck, shoulders, hips and groin as your limbs and body move through the water. Another benefit from the strength and improved co-ordination you build up in swimming is the reduction in risk of falls and hip fractures in the elderly. However, swimming will not build up your bones because you need to perform weight-bearing, land-based exercises to do this. ...read more.

Middle

As a sport, swimming provides a great cardiovascular workout that does not produce stress on the skeletal system like aerobics or jogging. Cardiovascular exercises are most effective in improving fitness and health, cardiovascular exercise usually involves vigorous exercise sustained over a period of serial minutes, and its effect is to increase the efficiency of lungs, heart and blood circulation. Under water, the chest is under pressure from the weight of the water squeezing inwards. Every breath requires more effort from the muscles used, especially in breathing in, have to work harder. As any muscle strengthens with exercise, this improves the whole respiratory system. The heart also has to work harder in order to meet the increased demand for nutrients by all the muscles which are being worked. What is the cardiovascular system? The cardiovascular system includes the heart and the blood vessels. The heart pumps blood, and the blood vessels channel and deliver it throughout the body. ...read more.

Conclusion

But using a variety of backstroke, front crawl (freestyle) and breast stroke will use all major muscle groups: abdominals, biceps and triceps, gluteals, hamstrings and quadriceps. Adnominals Biceps Triceps Hamstrings Quadriceps 2nd 10 minutes For the 2nd 10 minutes, we will use equipment, and isolate arm and leg muscles. For the 1st 5 minutes, I will use the flippers, and hold the float out in front of me, with my head in the water, to make me more streamlined, in order to glide through the water quicker. This isolates my leg muscles, the Hamstrings and Quadriceps. to isolate her arm muscles, the biceps, triceps and Gluteals. She will use joy stroke in her arms. We will swim alternately, each of us doing 2 lengths at a time, after 5 minutes, we will swap over, and I will use the buoy will use the flippers and float. This will help strengthen our arm and leg muscles, which will help swimming and other sports. Me Jennifer Using flippers and float using buoy Isolated leg muscles Isolated arm muscles Hamstrings Quadriceps Biceps Triceps ...read more.

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3 star(s)

This is a good essay which would benefit from references to back up the text. The information is comprehensive and the diagrams that are included reinforce the ideas. However the two descriptions of training seemed very isolated within the body of the essay. An explanation before each section would have helped. 3 stars.

Marked by teacher Louise Star 09/07/2013

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