• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

But this version of the history (originated and constructed by the patriarchal structure) of women's movement in Bengal tells a completely different story when we look at it critically, from a male unbiased, feminist point of view

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

DEV 505: Gender and Development Development Studies Program, BRAC University, Spring 2006 Response Paper 1 Feminism in Bangladesh: Southern Feminist Theories, Feminist Movements Submitted to: Prof. Ferdous Azim Submitted By: Kazi Nazrul Fattah MDS, 6th Batch ID - 05262005 According to the popular history of the women's movement in Bengal - "the women of Bengal and Bangladesh have, throughout the history of the subcontinent, fought for their rights and many a learned man has also advocated gender equality and the rights of women in the region."1 Historical figures like Raja Rammohan Roy (1772-1833), Iswar Chandra Bidyashagar (1820-1891), Mohishi Debendranath Thakur are iconized as social reformers who have struggled untiringly for the rights of women, to stop the discrimination, to emancipate women from a position of being "a weak, helpless creature and a mere ornament and procreator of children to carry on the family name."2 But this version of the history (originated and constructed by the patriarchal structure) of women's movement in Bengal tells a completely different story when we look at it critically, from a male unbiased, feminist point of view. ...read more.

Middle

colonial period further crippled women, through a highly discriminated adoption of 'modern', 'advanced', European material values in the ideology of the nineteenth century patriarchal structure. Through this adoption while the material elements that empowered the westerners, i.e. science, technology, rational forms of economic organization, modern methods of statecraft were given to the male, women were assigned the role to uphold the traditional and spiritual values. In practice this was nothing different from the traditional patriarchy, in fact worse than ever it now confined the western knowledge, technology and 'advanced material thinking' to male only.4 However, at the beginning of the twentieth century a few female activists, concerned solely with women's issues for women's sake, came forward. Begum Rokeya Sakhawat Hossain was the most eminent of them. She stood firmly apart from the political, nationalist movements and started her own struggle for women's emancipation. Although well aware of the political situation, Begum Rokeya worked in an autonomous way. She established the first Bengali school for the Muslim girls in undivided Bengal. Being a prolific writer, she wrote books and articles on the injustice and discrimination against women. ...read more.

Conclusion

Also women have little active participation in policy planning and decision making. Even the women's issues are dealt by the patriarchy, most often women in power i.e. the prime minister of Bangladesh and the leader of the opposition are completely unconcerned about women's issues and act as a part of the patriarchal system. Also, the women participating the women's activist groups or female leaders usually come from the elite class of the society, as a result can not play a strong role in creating women's participation from grass-root levels to policy planning. Women's issues are often politicized, as a result the gender aspect gets lost. The patriarchal society tries to maintain its structure and minimizes women's issues. This is why a feminist approach developed on the context of the socio-cultural scenario of Bangladesh is necessary to establish gender equity and ensure women's rights. 1 Development of the Socio-legal History of Bengali Women, Author unknown, Handout provided by BRAC Univesity. 2 Same as above. 3 The Nationalist Resolution of the Women's Question: Partha Chatterjee. 4 The Nationalist Resolution of the Women's Question: Partha Chatterjee. 5 Development of the Socio-legal History of Bengali Women, Author unknown, Handout provided by BRAC Univesity. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Sociology section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Sociology essays

  1. Approaches to History: Sociology and History

    But, their 'daringness' was somewhat constrained by the contexts in which they lived as well as the social interests they saw themselves as representing.

  2. Response to Fritjof Capra's "The Turning Point"

    Pasteur proved the relationship of germs to disease. This led to the taxonomy of microorganisms. It all fit into the "machine" view of things. Pasteur was concerned with the ecology or "terrain" of the organisms. He wanted to know how the conditions in which the germs existed would affect their viability.

  1. Assess The Feminist View That Conventional Malestream Theories Are Inadequate For An Understanding Of ...

    Heidensohn has suggested that although female crime is recognised today. It is often tackled on the surface. Since 1977, studies into female crime have increased and this is reflected in the official crime figures. Pollack (1961) has suggested that the official statistics are inaccurate.

  2. The purpose of this essay is to describe four studies relating to gender each ...

    of maintaining the stability of its members and therefore maintaining stability amid society. Parsons study shows the importance of the socialisation of children and young adults. It also displays the family as a positive and diverse institution that can adapt to meet the needs of society.

  1. Pitted against Patriarchy

    Not all writers, whether they are men or women, are politically motivated yet their work is a reflection of the circumstances in which they write, the opportunities created by publishing and the challenges posed by attempting to challenge hegemonic discourses.

  2. West Side Story

    for example do they make the immigrants responsible for the bad economical situation some of them are in (Act I, Scene 1). The second group we meet is the Sharks. They are all immigrants from Puerto Rico who all came to find a better life.

  1. Discuss the ways that domestic ideology constructed femininity and what this meant for women's ...

    (Adam 1975, p.82) In other words, women were expected to step down from their roles as workers to allow the men to reclaim their jobs and the women to return to their rightful place within the home or domestic related work.

  2. Suffrage movement during the progressive era.

    Some women liked the idea of clubs and unions because it allowed them to challenge the norm without sacrificing themselves completely. They believed it was necessary for the removal of the age old gender distinctions. The biggest affect that clubs had on women was their ability to bring all the middle-class women together.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work