• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Creative Writing - The Bliss Of Acceptance.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Personal Imaginative Unit - English Coursework - Creative Writing The Bliss Of Acceptance The plane's contact with the ground woke me from my semi-conscious state and I looked around anxiously, to see where I was. We had finally landed, and I felt life flow back into my limbs as I stretched in my seat. A gentle murmur rose as the plane slowed down, and the reassuring sound of the pilot echoed through the plane. "Ladies and gentlemen, we have now arrived in Delhi, the temperature is a pleasant forty three degrees with cloudless skies, and local time is four fifteen PM". Stewardesses strutted up and down isles collecting litter, and passengers began to abscond from the plane. As I lifted myself to my feet, still in a half alert state from jetlag-induced fatigue, I stumbled into the sunshine outside. The blue sky dazzled my agitated eyes, and I grumbled to myself in irritation. The scorching hot sun was already upon me, burning my unconditioned skin in a similar way to a magnifying glass burning an ant. Hours followed as we collected bags; showed passports and performed countless other tasks that made me want to curl up on the floor and lapse into hibernation. Whether I was in Delhi or London, I was still exhausted and cantankerous. Finally we managed to obtain our car, and, as I had suspected, a long trip hundreds of miles upwards to Northern India followed. On our journey, my irritation began to crumble. ...read more.

Middle

A well-known phrase of his is: "The human soul is as material and mortal as the human body. To live a good life, is to exercise prudence and to enjoy life through stimulating the senses, subjecting oneself to tranquillity and scientific study." Later, however, he concluded that to obtain true happiness one must have a number of things. Friends, a frugal lifestyle, time and thought were all considered prerequisites for happiness. Visualising the crowded metropolis of London in my mind, trying to ignore the shouting of the stall keepers intent on making me buy their spinach, I felt that we had all these. What was it that these people had that we did not? This question remained on my mind throughout my trip in India; through the bustle of the city in Jalundar; the peaceful tranquillity in the village; the faint sounds of gunshots near Kashmir; even during the humorous incident of seeing a man squat in the middle of a field only feet away from a road. Sitting back at home in London listening to the gentle drumming of the rain, I contemplated why it was so hard for the Western man to gain happiness. Like the correct document finally being found in a stack of papers, I finally produced the answer. A Ch'an (Zen) Buddhist once said: "Humans are afflicted with all external forms of life: we are subject to life and death, pleasure and pain, love and fear, good and evil, beautiful and ugly. ...read more.

Conclusion

The end result of this was that they were happy; they had no ambitions to gain wealth, and were satisfied with their lot. To be truly happy we must not linger in the past, or hypothesise about the future, but live life for the moment, and enjoy its small pleasures. By losing the foresight of the future, or hindsight in the past, we open up that world of acceptance. Some people will steal because they see that they have something more in their future. Some people will perform good deeds because they desire to feel better about themselves. In this society, we can never truly be completely happy. From our first few years of life we have ambitions: to decide what we will be when we grow up, and how we will choose to live our lives. Without these ambitions society would, unfortunately, not function correctly; no one would have any motivation to do well at their jobs and get promoted, as the idea of a Marxist/Communist society shows. It seems to me the human population has dug itself into a pit where the light of true happiness is growing more and more remote as we dig further and further down. There will always be, even in the mind of a Buddhist monk or Christian nun, a growing desire to gain something else, no matter what it may be. This, I conclude, makes it impossible for anyone in the modern 21st Century to gain the status of 'Buddha', or 'The Enlightened, or Blissful One'. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Sociology section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Sociology essays

  1. Does Boxing have a future?

    Or 'gradually', meaning the brain damage builds up as a result of repeated blows to the head. Another argument against boxing is that violence leads to violence. The argument that violence begets violence is two fold. First boxing encourages the use of violence in other circumstances.

  2. The Glass Ceiling

    Any woman has the potential to break down the glass ceiling; they just have to use their assets to the best of their ability. It is true that things are getting better for women in the workplace. They are beginning to make little cracks in the glass ceiling, but things are still no where near to being equal.

  1. What is happiness?

    Your actions do not result because of some sort of personal benefit but because we are obligated to do good things regardless of the consequences (Thoughts of Kant's Ethics). In fact, Kant says that it's better not to feel happiness after committing a moral act, because he believed that if

  2. “The Journey Towards Enlightenment”

    One must accept the equality of all humanity. Though this realization may not be shared by all of one's generation, it nonetheless forms a beginning for one's self. With greater understanding one experiences a proportional rise in one's own consciousness. With time, one begins to finally act upon one's greater awareness.

  1. Analysis of "Mona Lisa Smile"

    However, with his new job, he never had time to stay at home with her. He traveled frequently, supposedly on business, until Betty finely learned that he had been seeing another woman. Giselle had also seen him out with this other woman, while she was out on the town with an older man, twice her age.

  2. Analysis of Paul Cobb's 'Where is the mind?'

    Although the justification for the inclusion of coursework in that assessment is on the basis of its value as a learning activity, I am sure that my current school is no exception in its general approach to that as solely something that has to be done as part of the assessment.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work