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During the course of America's history, the women's suffrage movement experienced many dynamics. It is commonly recognized as having

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Introduction

Joe Bohn HIS212 Prof. Thomas Jackson America's Constitutional Enfranchisement of Women During the course of America's history, the women's suffrage movement experienced many dynamics. It is commonly recognized as having been initiated with the women's involvement in helping black slaves achieve freedom from slavery and overall citizenship rights. Little did these women know that the soon to be instituted 15th amendment would constitutionally enfranchise men of every race and ethnicity, but still exclude them. For those women who had been actively involved in helping the Negroes gain a sympathetic voice, this neglect to acknowledge women in the amendment was nothing less than a heinous outrage. They quickly realized that the governing body of white men would more quickly give freedom to uneducated and poor foreigners than to their own mothers and wives, whom were steadily beginning to make financial contributions at home as a result of industrialization. Herein, I'll illustrate how the frequent lack of unity amongst the various women's suffrage organizations postponed their attainment of full constitutional enfranchisement. Women, who had formerly helped the Negroes attain freedom, formed their own suffrage organizations, shortly after the creation of the 15th amendment. ...read more.

Middle

Some even went so far as to say that women were morally superior to men. Often times, men found that it was easier to sympathize with the more right wing, conservative, social feminists, rather than the left wing, equal-rights feminists. Each wing attacked the other wing's rhetoric. Many of the conservative women did not, in fact, desire the privileges that the left-wingers were fighting for, while the left-wingers saw the conservative women as merely being meek in their objectives, a hindrance to their own more radical goals. The more conservative women's organization of the times was known as the AWSA-more commonly identified in terms of social feminist rhetoric, while the more radical left-wing women's enfranchisement organization was known as the NWSA-more commonly identified in terms of equal rights feminist rhetoric. It is worth mentioning though, that men found it difficult to keep up with the difference between the two, especially in light of the fact that they often spoke about similar issues such as the expansion of educational and employment opportunities. It is not surprising, for that reason, that both organizations eventually joined forces to form the NAWSA. ...read more.

Conclusion

The NAWSA feared that the NWP would alienate currently sympathetic democrats. Fortunately, despite the NAWSA's objections, the NWP's picketing tactics caused the president and congress to get nervous and embrace the more conservative wing, the NAWSA, which was patriotically supporting the current war effort, thereby helping working middle-class women gain favor and expediting the enfranchisement process. In the end, as a result of Woodrow Wilson's administration, the favorable public opinion of women's patriotism during wartime and the enormous membership of the NASWA, which peaked at 2 million, congress finally passed a woman's suffrage amendment. The amendment was legally endorsed nationwide by late August of 1920. In conclusion, the enfranchisement effort was long threatened by the inconsistency, the lack of focus and unity by the various women's organizations, but in the end, that same lack of unity forced the American government to consider the amount of energy that women were investing into this movement. Women dynamically showed their desire to become enfranchised, each in their own way: some by picketing, some by lobbying senators, some by merely holding membership in an organization. It was this phenomenal membership and its capacity to do either harm or good that eventually overwhelmed the male governing body. ?? ?? ?? ?? 2 ...read more.

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