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In the article by John Clarke and Chas Critcher, they see the problem of inequality in leisure being linked to two aspects - material and cultural.

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Introduction

Ashley Dawes j0367004 Pauline Anderson Element 1 - Essay In the article by John Clarke and Chas Critcher, they see the problem of inequality in leisure being linked to two aspects - material and cultural. The material aspect can be linked to a persons own possessions and availability. They refer to it as 1 "key resources, essentially those of time and money". The Cultural aspect however can be linked with perception and the views of society. 2 "...the perception of what is appropriate leisure behaviour for a member of a particular social group". They make the point that not only are the perceptions of the people in the group important, but the views of those outside can also be important if they are in a position to do something about it by enforcing power. For example, at a golf club, you may deem it acceptable to turn up with t-shirt and jeans, but the president of the Golf club may view it as unacceptable and may remove you from the club. ...read more.

Middle

These were listed as reasons as to why they don't do leisure activities. This shows that women do not feel safe, but they could be using women's vulnerability as an excuse not to do leisure. The man has a big part in women's leisure. Often, the husband has an impact on what his wife does. Deem believes that some husbands are happy for their wives to take part in leisure activities as long as it doesn't affect her duty to him. She says: 7 "...for instance, a husband may be happy for his wife to belong to a flower arranging club...but less happy if she took a part-time job involving no more hours out of the house". Race plays a big part in the inequality of leisure. Racism is often found in society today and has an impact on what activities certain races take part in. For example, in my years at Enville Golf Club, I have never seen an Asian person play there. ...read more.

Conclusion

Although both are sporting groups. It is seen as an upper class thing to be a member of a Golf Club, whereas the working class, who stereotypically spend a lot of time in the pub and play football at the weekend, are linked with playing football. They also talk about how going for a meal might sound the same, but where a person eats and what they eat can be determined by class. In my lifetime, many things have constrained my leisure such as available time and family commitments, such as looking after my cousin or family outings. My part time job and my education also take up a lot of my time. However, the main constraint on me has been money, as it has stopped me doing a lot of things. I would love to go to watch my favourite football team play every week, but due to lack of money, I cannot. Also, I would love to buy the very best equipment to help my Djing, which is a favourite hobby, but the price of the equipment is too much. Different factors affect different people, but everyone has constraints on their leisure. ...read more.

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