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Integrative assesment strand

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

SOCIAL SCIENCE INTEGRATIVE ASSESSMENT STRAND Research Question Does the UK employ an effective policy for tackling the negative effects associated with drug use? STUDENT NAME: STUDENT ID: WORD COUNT: 4635 (chapter 1: 1054) (chapter 2: 3044) (chapter 3: 537) CONTENTS PAGE CHAPTER 1; PLAN 1.1 Topic for investigation and rationale for selecting topic. P.01 1.2 Research question/hypothesis. P.01 1.3 Aims and objectives. P.01 1.4 The two social science disciplines applied in the P.01 investigation. 1.5 Timescale for research. P.02 1.6 Methods and resources to be used. P.02 1.7 Key texts and articles. P.03 1.8 Evidence for the approach adopted. P.04 1.9 Justification for the approach adopted. P.05 CHAPTER 2; DEVELOPMENT 2.1 Introduction. P.06 2.2 The central issue. P.06 2.3 Methods for investigation. P.07 2.4 Discussion of two social science disciplines applied. P.07 2.5 Discussion of document referred to in investigation. P.09 2.6 Findings. P.11 2.7 Interpretation and analysis of data collected. P.13 2.8 Conclusion. P.13 CHAPTER 3; EVALUATION 3.1 Initial analysis of task. P.16 3.2 Strengths and weaknesses of original design. P.16 3.3 Information on sufficiency of data/sources gathered. P.16 3.4 Review of the design P.16 3.5 Integrative nature of the investigation P.17 3.6 Problems/issues with approach. P.17 3.7 Skills learned after experience. P.17 3.8 Link between conclusion and aims. P.17 3.9 Strengths and weaknesses. P.18 APPENDICES; Appendix 1 P.19 Appendix 2 P.20 Appendix 3 P.21 Appendix 4 P.23 Appendix 5 P.24 BIBLIOGRAPHY & ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS P.25 CHAPTER 1. 1.1 The topic that is to be investigated for the purpose of this report is UK drug policy. The investigation will focus on drug use and contrasting drug policies to highlight the key issues. It is a topic that is consistently surrounded by debate, controversy and myth, therefore there is a wealth of literature, reports and statistics available to the researcher willing to investigate. For example the recent media attention given to a report by the new UK Drug Policy Commission (UKDPC) ...read more.

Middle

f. In terms of it's remit Reuter and Stevens report met its original aim in an objective and structured manner. However It could have been improved upon by examining and offering alternatives to current UK drug policy. It could also incorporate social theories and party policies, although this could result in bias and remove focus from the initial and more simpler aim. 2.6 The aim of this report is to determine the effectiveness and implications of UK drug policy. After reviewing the relevant material, comparing ideologies and policies and applying sociological theory, the following was found; * Evidence suggests there is a strong correlation between problem drug use and acquisitive crime such as muggings, burglary and theft. For example 69 percent of arrestees tested positive for one or more illegal drugs. Similarly 60 percent of arrestees who reported using one or more illegal drugs and committing one or more acquisitive crimes acknowledged a link between their drug use and offending behaviour. (www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rdspdfs2/r179.PDF) * Prohibition as a policy appears to be having little effect on problem drug use and related crime in the UK. Between 1994 and 2005, the annual number of people imprisoned rose by 111 percent and the average length of their sentences increased by 29 percent. In contrast drug use has increased significantly in the last decade and most recent estimate was that there were 327,000 problematic drug users in England 2004/5. (An Analysis of UK Drug Policy 2007 P19) * The Home Office defends government drug policy and argues that more drugs are being seized, offenders caught (See Appendix 4 and 5) drug related crime is falling and record numbers are entering and staying in treatment (See Appendix 3). In 2005/6, the number of individuals receiving structured treatment rose by 13 percent from the previous year. While the number of drug related deaths in England fell by 14 percent from their peak of 1,666 in 2002 to 1,427 in 2004.(www.drugs.gov.uk) ...read more.

Conclusion

The increase, for the most part, was due to an increase in the recording of possession of cannabis offences which coincided with an increase in the number of formal warnings for cannabis possession which were issued. * With effect from 1 April 1998, offences of drug possession and other drug offences were introduced into the series. Understanding the chart * Numbers of recorded crimes are affected by changes in reporting and recording practices. Expanded coverage and revised Counting Rules came into effect in April 1998. The National Crime Recording Standard was introduced nationally in April 2002. The national impact in 2002/03 was estimated to be 10 per cent for total recorded offences. It is not possible to estimate the effect on the total number of drug offences. * In 1998/99, the chart shows a break because of changes in the way police were asked to record 'Drug offences'. It is not possible to draw direct comparisons before and after 1998/99. * Data for the British Transport Police are included from 2002/03 onwards. *Taken from http://www.crimestatistics.org.uk/output/page16.asp APPENDIX 5 'Possession of controlled drugs' - Long-term national recorded crime trend Source: Research Development and Statistics (CRCSG) Home Office * There were a total of 152,627 possession of controlled drug offences recorded by the police in 2005/06. This is an increase of 27 per cent from the previous year. The increase, for the most part, was due to an increase in the recording of possession of cannabis offences which coincided with an increase in the number of formal warnings for cannabis possession which were issued. * Possession of controlled drugs offences were introduced into the series with effect from 1 April 1998. Understanding the chart * Numbers of recorded crimes are affected by changes in reporting and recording practices. The National Crime Recording Standard was introduced nationally in April 2002. The national impact in 2002/03 was estimated to be 10 per cent for total recorded offences. It is not possible to estimate the effect on the number of drug possession offences. * Data for the British Transport Police are included from 2002/03 onwards. *Taken from http://www.crimestatistics.org.uk/output/page17. ...read more.

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