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Prostitution in South East Asia and its effect on Female Identity.

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521109 Prostitution in South East Asia and its effect on Female Identity In this essay I will be exploring the state of prostitution in South East Asia today and I will be evaluating the effect that it has on female identity in South East Asia. I hope to come to a conclusive decision about my position on the subject and I will fully draw my conclusion towards the end of the essay. Prostitution is the exchange of sex for money, a practice that for the most part involves men buying sex from women, boys, or girls. Patriarchy has mislabelled prostitution the "oldest profession" to suggest that it is an inevitable practice. In fact, it developed during historical periods that excluded women from public life. Women who were not confined by either slave labour or domestic labour in the home were assumed to be prostitutes or had no alternative means of survival. Prostitution persists in this form in underdeveloped countries today, where there are few possibilities for economic survival for women who labour in the informal domestic sector. With industrialization, sex industries transform local, indigenous prostitution into major commodity markets. The twentieth century saw the rise of the world marketplace. In this new world market, Thailand and the Philippines have recently stepped in to play the role of whorehouse to the world. This is facilitated by developing agents having disregarded the development of women's opportunities for economic independence, leaving 521109 Prostitution as the highest paying job available to many of the women of Southeast Asia. ...read more.


Then, once they have begun to make some money, in most cases, they send large portions of those earning home. That, or the women start off indentured to prostitute themselves to pay off loans their families accept from their daughters's future employers. It is an established phenomenon that access to education is an important indicator for establishing the extent to which a community is benefiting from the changes that accompany economic development. In the case of rural Thai women, that access has been severely limited, due in part, it seems, to their rural placement and also their gender. Effectively women and the female identity is suppressed in Thailand, women are commodities in the main part and those that do actually work in more professional jobs are few and far between and find themselves to be on lower wages than men in equivalent or even lower positions. While the foreign aspect of prostitution in Thailand and the Philippines may garner the most attention and money, most of the customers, patronizing the cheapest establishments, are native: much of the impetus sustaining the incredible rate of 521109 prostitution in Thailand is cultural. Thai men think it is their right to have cheap sex, and there are enough poor Thai women to make it possible. Prostitution in many cases has become integrated with initiation rights: for many Thai men, a trip to the neighbourhood brothel is a rite of passage, a tradition passed from father to son. ...read more.


What is available to these women? Destitution or a career as a madam, helping the pimps control the younger women who are marketable commodities. Men and boys are sent the message that purchasing the body of a woman or girl for sex is no different from buying a pack of cigarettes. With no social stigma attached to buying prostitutes, the demand for prostitution escalates. At the same time, women and girls internalize the message that the female body is a marketable commodity. Girls begin to see prostitution as a career option, unaware that sex work is a trap that will deprive them of control over their lives. I would suggest that the values and dynamics of prostitution spill over into other areas of society, influencing the valuation and treatment of women and girls and lowering their status and the female identity as a whole. Before we can begin to address the oppression of the female identity and the enslavement of women and girls by global sex industries, we need to recognize that sex trafficking, sex tourism, sexual exploitation on the internet, and organized prostitution are interrelated practices of gender-based domination and control that 521109 constitute contemporary forms of slavery. When this is recognised and the Asian Governments are prepared to enforce laws that might be able to penalize the sex industry profiteers as opposed to the real victims (the women), then we might be able to gradually decrease the amount of prostitution that goes on in the East in particular, and eventually perhaps get rid of it altogether. ...read more.

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