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Making Insoluble Salts by Precipitation. Aim: to observe what happens when two solutions are mixed and to use the data obtained to establish rules of solubility for a number of salts.

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Introduction

Victor Van Der Helm 06/01/11 Making Insoluble Salts by Precipitation Aim: to observe what happens when two solutions are mixed and to use the data obtained to establish rules of solubility for a number of salts. Apparatus: The equipment needed in order to successfully complete this lab will be, about half a dozen clean test tubes, a test tube rack, a pipette, and the various different substances which should be at your disposition. Diagram: Method: Once equipped with suitable safety gear, mix together equal small amounts, of about 2cm depth, of each type of salt. Do as many test as time and material permit. ...read more.

Middle

Clear colourless MgSO4 Scant white precipitate MgCO3 Scant white precipitate Mg(OH)2 Clear colourless MgCl2 Clear colourless MgBr2 Clear colourless MgI2 Copper (II) (+2) Clear pale blue CuSO4 Light blue precipitate CuCO3 Blue precipitate Cu(OH)2 Scant light blue precipitate CuCl2 Clear blue CuBr2 Redish brown -dark orange precipitate CuI2 Barium (+2) Scant white precipitate BaSO4 Scan white precipitate BaCO3 Clear colourless Ba(OH2) Clear colourless BaCl2 Clear colourless BaBr2 Clear colourless BaI2 Silver (+3) Light grey precipitate AgSO4 Light brown precipitate Ag2CO3 Dark brown precipitate AgOH White precipitate AgCl Pale yellow precipitate AgBr Yellowish precipitate AgI Potassium (+) Clear colourless K2(SO4) Clear colourless K2(CO3) Clear colourless K(OH)2 Clear colourless KCL2 Clear colourless KBr2 Clear colourless KI2 Iron (III) ...read more.

Conclusion

+ 2NaNO3(aq) 2Ag (+) + Cl (2-) => Ag2Cl(s) 5):2AgNO3(aq) + Na2CO3(aq) => Ag2CO3(s) + 2NaNO3(aq) 2Ag(+) + CO3(2-) => Ag2CO3 2)) 1) Zn(NO3)2(aq) + Na2SO4(aq) => ZnSO4(aq) + 2NaNO3(aq) 2) 2Ag(NO3)3(aq) + 3NaSO4(aq) => Al2(SO4)3(s) + 6NaNO3(aq) Conclusion: During this experiment we have become familiar with two type of solutions. One a precipitate solution, the other a clear solution. Either of these states could be coloured. In conclusion, we can see that the salts that seem to dissolve the most, are Chloride, Bromine, Sodium Potassium, Ammonium, Calcium and Iodide, as they have solutions which are mostly found clear and colourless, most likely meaning that these salts formed by these elements are going to be more soluble then the other salts. The other salts forming coloured and precipitated solutions, are most likely going to be less soluble, then the other these salts. ...read more.

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