• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Great Expectations - The More Effective Ending? Charles Dickens Great Expectations has two contradicting endings, one of which is more conventional and the other more realistic.

Extracts from this document...


The More Effective Ending of Great Expectations The arousal of emotions through the use of pathos is usually what allows for a writer to give significance to his or her novel. An event or situation that captivates the reader is usually presented or displayed within the final chapter or ending of any novel. Charles Dickens' Great Expectations has two contradicting endings, one of which is more conventional and the other more realistic. The more conventional and up-to-date ending that Dickens was forced to write in order to please the novelist Edward Lytton, who criticised his original ending, provides Pip with a happy ending and leaves the readers with the idea and hope that Pip and Estella might eventually build a loving relationship. ...read more.


Throughout the majority of the novel, Dickens exhibits a serious tone, and this is the reason each and every event that took place was vital and helped emphasize the numerous aspects of Pip's life. Similarly, the original ending highlights the same tone, and this, in turn, provides consistency in the mood Dickens wanted to draw the readers' attention to. Both the beginning and middle of the novel displayed an upsetting mood. Therefore, the fact that the second ending displayed a pleasant mood caused the readers to consider it an outrage on the entirety of the novel. Providing Pip with a "happy ending" caused confusion in the social and moral meanings of as well as the aspect of reality within the novel; this, in turn, is due to the idea that Pip receives more than he deserves during the second ending. ...read more.


In conclusion, the original ending has shown to emphasize Great Expectation's true meaning and value and has shown to be more realistic than the second, conventional ending. Dickens mainly focused on remaining consistent throughout the novel by exhibiting the same tone, mood, and characteristics of each character, particularly Estella. He pointed out the disdain Pip was going through and managed to cause readers to feel sympathy towards his state or situation. This, in turn, highlighted the novel's significance and capability of impacting those who read it; this is due to the idea that was stated earlier and that claims that the final chapter or ending of a novel is of great importance to the novel as its content is what positively affects the entirety of the novel. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our International Baccalaureate World Literature section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related International Baccalaureate World Literature essays

  1. Creative Ending to Handmaids Tale

    They must be a part of the plan. After about an hour of driving through the plains we encounter a security checkpoint to check vehicles entering and leaving the boundaries of Gilead, or so the Aunts tell us. Nick opens a compartment in the seat and tells me to get inside; I silently agreed and hid inside.

  2. Reading Notes: Great Expectations Plot Outline

    There he learns everything on becoming a gentleman. He loves his new life and couldn't ask for more. It seems as if he becomes a snob because when Joe comes to visit, he is instantly embarrassed by him. He then sees Estella again at a visit to the Satis house.

  1. Social Distinction in the novel Pygmalion

    Doolittle, Eliza's father. Mr. Doolittle is a "common dustman," an insolent man who spends his time drinking alcohol at the local pub. He is not too proud to beg for money, even from Eliza. Moreover, he lives with a woman to whom he is not married.

  2. Great Expectations as a Bildungsroman

    This is his "search for meaningful existence within society". We see his happiness and eagerness when he finds out that he has inherited a fortune, "My dream was out; my wild fancy was surpassed by sober reality; Miss Havisham was going to make my fortune on a grand scale."

  1. Two Kinds by Amy Tan and Under Pressure by Carl Honor are two texts ...

    to grow up to be what they want to be, instead of what their parents want them to be. To emphasise the fact that pushing one’s child normally fails, Carl Honoré uses voice as a literary device to contrast with Amy Tan’s description of her relationship with her mother.

  2. Watership Down. In the novel Watership Down by Richard Adams, the protagonist character ...

    Blackberry then asks Hazel, "now we swim ourselves. Can we start? (49) Hazel "still could not understand what had happened, but at least he realized that Blackberry wanted him to show authority." (49) Hazel clears his head and commands everyone to swim while he himself plunges into the water.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work