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How has Jane Harrison used Stolen as her vehicle for promoting her ideas about social justice?

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Introduction

Ms Townend How has Jane Harrison used Stolen as her vehicle for promoting her ideas about social justice? Stolen Jeremiah Joseph . 2/23/2009 Stolen, by Jane Harrison, is written to educate people as to how the Stolen Generation affected Aboriginal's lives. Harrison uses several methods to portray typical paths through life that Aboriginal children of the Stolen Generation faced. Therefore it is imperative to examine Harrison's use of characters, style, action and setting description as her vehicle for promoting her ideas about social justice. These are that every person should be treated equally. The Stolen Generation is a term used to describe children of Aboriginal descent that were forcibly removed from their Indigenous Aboriginal families by Australian governments throughout the late 19th century and the early 20th century. Their removal was part of a plan to integrate half Aboriginal and half European children into European society. Social Justice is the equal division of human rights and opportunities between race, gender and religion. Harrison integrates these two to show the inequalities experienced by families and their children during the Stolen Generation. Harrison uses setting frequently throughout the play as symbols for the things that Aboriginal children of the Stolen Generation face throughout their lives. ...read more.

Middle

Sandy was stolen at an older age and so remembers his Aboriginal past, this makes it hard for him to forget his Indigenous heritage. Sandy's heritage shows in his willingness to keep the group together. Harrison uses this to demonstrate how Aboriginal heritage can never be lost. Shirley illustrates the continuing cycle of the Stolen Generation; she was taken as a child and lives to see her own children taken away from her. This shows the devastating and everlasting effect that children of the Stolen Generation have to go through throughout their lives; it continues throughout generations and can destroy a life twice. Ruby is one of the horror stories of the Stolen Generation; she was beaten and abused as a child and lives to be a housekeeper that develops a mental illness. This illustrates a common sight with children involved in the Stolen Generation. Ruby was abused by her foster parents, "What did he do to ya? / I promised not to tell" (lines 12 - 13 Pg 15). This greatly affected the outcome of the rest of her life, highlighting the horrors experienced by children of the Stolen Generation are carried with them throughout their lives. ...read more.

Conclusion

This develops individual narratives within the play which highlight constantly changing scenarios which each character has to deal with. This highlights how each character had to cope with their troubles individually. This forced them to further distance themselves from childish nature, forcing them to become adults. Harrison uses this to highlight the social injustice faced by Aboriginal children of the Stolen Generation. Harrison also distinguishes between each characters meeting of their mother at the end of the play. Harrison uses this to show that each child's experience throughout the period of the Stolen Generation. However, Harrison integrates the loss of time within all of the characters meetings to highlight things that can never be regained. This is used to show that the social injustice faced by Aboriginal children of the Stolen Generation can never heal. Harrison uses Stolen to illustrate the social injustice faced by Aboriginal children of the Stole Generation. This is highlighted through her use of characters, style, action and setting description. Harrison interlinks these styles by incorporating a theme of negligence into each aspect of her play. Social justice is the equal division of human rights and opportunities between race, gender and religion, Harrison integrates her ideas that everybody should be treated equally into Stolen. ?? ?? ?? ?? Jeremiah Joseph Ms Townend Page 2 of 5 ...read more.

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