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Unseen Commentary from Gweilo (pg 130-132) This extract (pg 130- 132) gives us an insight on one of Martins interesting but bizarre adventures.

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Introduction

Unseen Commentary from "Gweilo" (pg 130-132) This extract (pg 130- 132) gives us an insight on one of Martin's interesting but bizarre adventures. In this extract, we see Martin meets a narrow minded man called Nagasaki Jim. In this commentary, I will be explaining how Martin Booth uses literally technique to slowly reveal this scene and to describe it. The extract opens with a strong impactful sentence 'You lo go dis place (Nagasaki Jim)'. Martin Booth uses this short sentence to present a small hint to audience about the near future. We (the audience) know that Martin is a very adventurous. Knowing this, we make out that Martin will go into Nagasaki's place and something dreadful may happen. ...read more.

Middle

This builds suspicion in the mind of the audience. It makes us question ourselves why Nagasaki Jim is doing this and is what he is going to do now. The description during the dialogue, of how Martin was cautious shows us that even though Martin is a daring boy, he does sense that Nagasaki may do something. The simile 'My seventh puerile sense was tingling like a high-tension cable' emphasizes the feeling of something dangerous going to happen. By comparing his childish feeling to a high-tension cable gives me the impression for the first time in the book that Martin may back-off because of his fears and leave. ...read more.

Conclusion

The audience is shocked and devastated when Nagasaki says 'Show me your winkle'. The tension and pressure is finally broken. From this line we, the audience figure that Nagasaki is a very narrow minded man. The simile followed by the quote above 'I was not as green as I was cabbage-looking' shows that Martin knows what is happening. Thought the simile, Martin tries to say that he is not dumb however the words (cabbage-looking) used by the author gives us an impression that Martin is na�ve. The author reminds us that Martin is still a young boy. 'Nagasaki Jim hanged himself' is a shock, sudden impact for the audience. The comma gives a short and sharp end to the chapter. This line makes us the audience feel sorry for him, even thought he did all does bad things. ...read more.

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