• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Was a guilty social conscience the most important factor in the demise of British Bull-baiting?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Was a guilty social conscience the most important factor in the demise of British Bull-baiting? The Sport of Bull-baiting became popular amongst all tiers of society in Britain in the Eighteenth century and provided entertainment for its viewers. At the sports' peak, almost every town in England held a bull-baiting event as it was a great opportunity to raise a town's prestige and also to generate income from tourism. Bull-baiting has rather simple rules: a bull was harnessed and attached to a length of rope which had been tied to a stake in the ground. The bull was deliberated incensed and aggravated before a dog or a group of dogs were released upon the tethered animal with the aim of biting and holding the bull's neck, also known as pinning the bull. Dogs were frequently injured by the bulls and injuries such as broken limbs were common. In turn, the bull was also often injured by the dogs' bites. After the event the bull would be slaughtered by a local butcher and used for its meat. As the spectacle of bull-baiting reached its peak in the late Eighteenth century, a rising number of contemporary writers and thinkers began to consider the cruelty expressed by bull baiting1, and other blood sports from the period such as dog-fighting, cock fighting and bear-baiting. ...read more.

Middle

The author of the source, a prolific painter from the period strengthens the source's reliability, as does the source's more objective approach to reporting Bull-baiting. The source objectively explains what bull-baiting involves before offering an insight into why the sport fell into demise. The objective nature of the source, combined with the fact that it is contemporary, and written by an authority on the subject of eighteenth and nineteenth century sports support the sources reliability.The source states that the press at the time took on the role of speaking for the outraged humanity5 and generally concerned itself in appealing to the social conscience of Britain's masses. The nature of the source, and its reliability give me reason to trust this statement and understand that the guilty social conscience and the sympathy towards the animals that was being expressed not only by great numbers of the population, but that was also being expressed in the increasingly accessable media was a very important factor in the demise of British Bull-baiting and other blood sports. The two articles already mentioned have helped to answer the essay question and after evaluating their reliability and usefulness, it is evident the two sources are quite easy to compare, and this similar nature of the source's perhaps explains why they both oppose bull-baiting and appear to represent those who were against bull-baiting. ...read more.

Conclusion

It is a secondary source but incorporates primary sources and an analysis of these in order to provide plenty of information. The source is mostly objective with offerings of the authors own thoughts combined with fact. This source also explains how religion was an important factor in the demise of British bull-baiting with quotes from contemporary puritans teachings about the human relationship with animals. In terms of religion, many argued that animals were sent 'for our use,but not for our abuse8' and that this mistreatment of animals was 'sinful and adverse to the divine law'9. There were many factors that bought about the demise of Birtish bull-baiting however I do not think that one can be singled out as the most important. Using the sources I have studied it is evident that although the social conscience of the masses was a mjaor factor, it was the reactions of the media, individuals and government to this guilt that bought about real changes. In terms of religion, the condemning of this cruelty to animals by the church added to the guitly conscience experienced in many areas of society and so is more of a combination factor than one on its own. It was a combination of conscience, individuals, government laws and church pressure that resulted in the demise of bull baiting so that by the end of the nineteenth century, it has completely disappeared. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our University Degree 1700-1799 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related University Degree 1700-1799 essays

  1. Marxism versus Sectarianism - "The dogs bark: therefore the caravan is moving." (Arab proverb) ...

    Unfortunately, life is short and we have too much work to do to permit ourselves such a luxury. There is an old Russian saying "A fool can ask more questions than twenty wise men can answer." But we will arm ourselves with patience and do what we can.

  2. Depictions of the Boston Massacre 1770. Though the newspaper article and the engraving had ...

    78 The Gazette's recounting of the Boston Massacre, which appeared on March 12, 1770, portrayed the confrontation between the British soldiers and the townspeople as a violent act perpetrated by oppressive soldiers against an innocent populace.9 Before describing the events of the Massacre itself, the Gazette article explains the confrontational

  1. The topic that colonial governor of Connecticut Thomas Fitch (1700-1774) wrote about in 1764

    Their subjection, then, to their Laws, is not forced, but voluntary. (Fitch, Thomas. "Reasons why the British colonies, in America, should not be charged with internal taxes." New Haven: 1764. pp. 1-20. The document appears to serve numerous purposes and is appealing to a wide range of audiences.

  2. With reference to any major uprising against political authority, assess the relative importance of ...

    A significant number of Russians, predominantly within the middle class, wanted a democracy with an elected government. However a democratic government could be attained in two ways, with a constitutional monarchy or as a republic. This split the middle classes into those who wanted a constitutional monarchy, following the KDs,

  1. How was the Nature and Geography of Rural Class Relations Changed by the 'Agricultural ...

    be enclosed in 1800 and tell how the parliamentary enclosure acts of 1801, 1836 and 1845 enclosed 1.8 million acres of arable and 1.3 million acres of common pasture and waste. These figures were probably underestimates and excluded non-parliamentary enclosure.

  2. To what extent did Britain benefit from her Empire in the Eighteenth century? ...

    satire, such as vicious literature against the leaders in the East India Company. Samuel Foote?s play the The Nabob was a scathing indictment of the moral corrosiveness of empire in India. The deepest concern was about liberty. It made the country re-think the cornerstone of its identity and how the paradox of how that translated to empire.

  1. From the available sources, what can we say about the roles and status of ...

    Information gathered by the American anthropologist Diane Bell and Australian feminist Hannah Rachel Bell (no relation) on two diverse traditional aboriginal societies gives an insight into traditional women?s roles. Diane Bell?s work with the Kaytej women of the Northern Territory explores the role that women had, and still have locally, in understanding territories and the connections between neighbouring territories.

  2. How was crime kept within tolerable bounds in England in the Eighteenth century?

    There was a complex machinery of criminal justice that could be utilised to maintain crime in tolerable bounds. While some historians have focused exclusively on legislation from parliament, there was in fact a rich interplay between these nationwide statements and the localities.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work