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Impact of the Computer

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Introduction

Impact of the Computer Case Study #1 1. Come up with ten examples of computers in society and, beside each example, describe what happens or would happen if that computer malfunctioned. 1Stock market computers - will affect the economy of the country and other related countries. 2Calculators - will make people calculate themselves so students who are having some math tests will face the hell =) 3Banding machine - will bring wrong products or nothing. 4Elevators - will make people to use stairs. 5Microwave - for melting something frozen, people will put it into hot water or wait it to be melted naturally. 6Air conditioner - will not turn off so make the room really cold or will not work well so it will not make the room cool. 7Room temperature control - will not be able to keep the room in the proper temperature. 8Oven - will make people use fire. 9Electronic dictionary - will make people use paper dictionary. ?Security system at BSS - will make security guard work at every door that need to be secured. 2. Come up with five examples of hidden computers and, beside each example, describe what happens or would happen if that computer malfunctioned. 1Automatic car washer-will make scratches on the car and will not wash the car properly and make people wash their cars with their hands. ...read more.

Middle

Take the rules to their logical extreme consequences. e.g. Following rule 1, would humans be allowed to drive cars or play football? Both activities are potentially dangerous. --> Rule 1 - would humans be allowed to ride and ride on the planes, elevators or trains? If people embark on them, they will just stop. Rule 2 - would human be able to order the robots to do dangerous works instead of human like dealing with strong chemicals or radioactive substances? Rule 3 - if human need to destroy them, how are human going to destroy them? They will not allow people to destroy them. --> In conclusion, Isaac Asimov's rules are not safeguards. Those rules restrict the usage of robots so much that human will not try to use them. What is the point of these rules if human even doesn't use the robots? 3. There are tiny computers hidden in appliances and cars. Would "Robot Rules" have to be built into them? Why? Even without Robot Rules, could such computers/robots turn on humans? What could happen if they did turn on humans? --> I do not think that those rules should be built into them, because in case of cars, the only way to turn on human will be done by destroying themselves, Also, usually tiny computers do simple works, so they will do what they are supposed to do. ...read more.

Conclusion

4. Is the Turing Test enough to decide whether a computer is intelligent, or not? For example, to be considered intelligent, is it enough that a computer can play chess, or should it know that it is playing chess? Is self-awareness a factor? Should it be? --> The Turing Test is not enough to decide whether a computer is intelligent. For example, some people thinks that ELIZA is a real therapist and it seemed that ELIZA passed the Turing Test, but ELIZA even cannot give a single advice to the user. Also, to be considered intelligent, computer should know that it is playing chess. If it even doesn't know what it is doing, it is just a machine not an intelligent computer. Therefore self-awareness is the strongest factor and it should be one of the most important factor that decides whether a computer is intelligent or not. Also if a computer has self-awareness, that would give computer the power to think itself like a living animal (perhaps smarter than human beings). Marking Scheme Knowledge/ Understanding Thinking/ Inquiry Communication Application Case Study #1 - Do Computers Have a Hidden Agenda? 1. 5 5 2. 2.5 2.5 3. 5 4. 3 Case Study #2 - Robot Rules 1. 4 1 2. 1 4 3. 1 6 Case Study #3 - Turing Test 1. 5 2. 5 3. 5 4. 1 4 Total 3 48.5 8.5 Percentages Test Total - out of 60 marks ?? ?? ?? ?? ICS4MI Ms. Shen Case study Sue Hyun Lee ...read more.

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