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Tartuffe theatre review - Tartuffe

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Introduction

Theatre Review - Tartuffe Tartuffe was written by Moli�re in France in the 19th century during the reign of King Louis XIV. It shows the Parisian high society, religion and most importantly, religious hypocrisy. In the play a religious fraud, Tartuffe, manages to persuade Orgon, a rich merchant, to stay in his wealthy, happy house by masquerading as a priest and appearing to be pious and wholehearted. During Tartuffe's stay in the household he nearly manages to trick Orgon into letting him drive away his son, Damis, marrying his daughter, Mariane, seducing his wife and imprisoning Orgon. This play explores the themes of status, trust, and the betrayal of trust, greed, jealousy, lust and families' duties and their expectations. It seems that Tartuffe is supposed to represent the people in society who do not live by any morals, but still try to preach religious piety and force upon others what they themselves do not follow, or respect. In the theatre, the stage actually appeared very small at first when there were no actors on it. It was a very minimalist set which meant that the few features on it, such as the two floral patterned, embroidered chairs and the grand black door gave the feeling of quite an austere, ...read more.

Middle

However Elmire's brother stops him from being angry and makes him see that it is best just be thankful for Louis XIV wisdom in spotting Tartuffe's trickery. This meant that the final movement of Orgon was that of gratefulness and love towards everyone in his family. This left us feeling happy that Orgon had finally managed to see sense, however, throughout the play we see how quickly he reaches judgements and so we can only hope that, like a child, he will learn from his mistakes. During the performance, lighting had a big impact on how we, the audience, interpreted certain situations. Throughout the play, until Tartuffe was captured, there always seemed to be a slight touch of steel wash mixed into the straw wash which gave the feeling of uneasiness and never quiet as a happy atmosphere as there could be. During the scene when Dorine ties to use reverse psychology on Marian by telling her that she must marry Tartuffe, when actually she should not, steel wash was used. By using a steel wash it gave the scene a feeling of entrapment and made everything that Dorine did seem even more cold and mean. ...read more.

Conclusion

When Moli�re first wrote Tartuffe, although the King loved the play, the Church, who wee extremely powerful, banned it for five years because of the religious hypocrisy. In Tartuffe Moli�re's is satirising religion. He did this in many other plays and also mocked the medical profession at that time. Other examples of these plays are, "The Hypochondriac" and "The School for Wives". Tartuffe was very cleverly adapted to be made relevant to a modern audience by using unexpected comedy and colloquial language For example, Dorine seemed to use the most modern day language coming out unexpectedly with phrases such as, "you talk a load of crap", "blabbermouth!", and "kiss my arse". This caught the attention of the audience because it was such a contrast from the rest of the words in the script. Also the words pious and hypocrite were used a lot of the time. I think that many of the themes used in Tartuffe were still very relevant today. For example, we still have outcasts who try to worm their way into our society. We also are still concerned with the status of people in the world and the betrayal of trust, greed, jealousy and lust. All these themes are entwined into our current everyday lives, even if we do not realise it. ?? ?? ?? ?? Danielle Clark Bryan G.C.S.E Drama Coursework March 2006 ...read more.

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