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A Picture Of Dorian Gray - from the Perspective of the Picture. (with commentary)

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Nathan Gornall Candidate Number: 3076 Center Number: 50415 English Literature and Language Coursework Original Texts by Oscar Wilde English Text Transformation Coursework This radio transcript is a transformation of "A Picture of Dorian Gray" by Oscar Wilde, from the perspective of the painting. Transformation CAST: * Main voice (the picture of Dorian Gray) * Lord Henry (male speaker) * Basil (male) * Dorian (male) * Maid 1 (female) * Maid 2 (female) Scene 1 VOICE: What's this? A thought? I am thinking? How am I thinking? I must have a mind! But if I have a mind, I must be a...thing. What am I? Ooh, hang on, I can see something, I can see something! I have an eye! Who is that? What is that man doing? Oh...no...stop that! Stop rubbing my eye with that brush! I have only had an eye for fifteen seconds and you are trying to paint over it. Oh, hang on. Ohhh now I see, you are making it beautiful! Yes, that eyebrow, a little bit more of an angle. Yes yes yes! Wonderful! Gosh I am a good looking eye! (pause, sombre tone) One eye. I am a passive observer to a man with a paintbrush. Is this to be my life's purpose? (voice becomes inspired) If it is, I will achieve my goal to great success; I will be the greatest observer of a man with a brush this world has ever seen! So come on man, get ready to be watched with the eagle stare of my eye. (Pause) Oh no, where have you gone? Man! Come back! Where are you?! I need...WOW! A second eye! I have two eyes! I feel so luxurious! Thank you man! I wonder what your name is. You look like a Phillip. You smell like a Richard. Oh my! I can smell! I have a nose! You've given me a nose Mr...Phillip-Richard! ...read more.


VOICE: The strangest thing Dorian. You've changed. You have that knife in your hand, are about to kill the only thing left of your, and Basil's past, and you are calm. Since that first time I set my eyes on you, this is the first time you have been calm. It suits you Dorian. You could have been a good man. A great man. Go on, destroy your past. And change, become the man you could have become. This is your chance Dorian. Let go of me, and your sins. Kill me Dorian. (The sound of rushed steps, a cry, and a crash) MAID 1: (calls from a far) Sir? Is all well? I heard a crash. MAID 2: (whispered) Shall I go up? MAID 1: (whispered) He might not appreciate a maid interrupting him MAID 2: (whispered) He might be in trouble, I'm going up MAID 1: (whispered) Wait, I'll come (Footsteps up stairs) MAID 1: Oh my god! Who is that retched man on the floor! Through the wrinkles and distorted features, it almost looks like Mr. Gray! Oh my it is! It's Dorian! He's dead! MAID 2: He looks so different! He looks old, and, hideous! What happened to his beauty? MAID 1: What a tragedy. He's lost his life and people now may forget his magnificent radiance, especially if they see him in this state MAID 2: No, look, people won't forget. Not with a painting of him, not with a painting as beautiful as that 1977 Commentary The base text of my transformation is "The picture of Dorian Gray" by Oscar Wilde. His wit and strong philosophies are what have cemented him as one of my favourate author/playwrights, and this was his only Novel. Initially, I decided to play on Wilde's love for wit, even in his darkest works, and transformed the piece into a comic modernization of the original. ...read more.


Why won't you answer me?!". The slow realization that no-one will ever be able to hear him doesn't defer the painting from speaking out, however. "Basil? I hope it is", this question is asked rhetorically, in a sense it is being asked to itself, and the painting knows it will not be answered. This composed speech is transformed when it realizing Dorian killed Basil, and the calm and collected thought process transforms into uncontrollable rage, "you horrible, repulsive, evil man!" The many switches in style of language save what is essentially a long monologue from becoming repetitive and dull. The painting shows a range of emotions, running through shock, fear, love, adoration, confusion, anger, hatred, and acceptance. The other characters in the script will never interact intentionally with the painting, yet there are still moments of emotional dialogue, particularly between Dorian and the painting during his breakdown. Other than re-starting my transformation altogether when my first attempt became too much of a parody, I didn't make many dramatic alterations between the different drafts of my transformation. My first drafts came out as good pieces of writing, but not great pieces of drama. Most of my adaptations were to build suspense and tension, and to create a script that would grip the listener and drive the feelings of empathy into them. Oscar Wilde didn't write realistic reports on society, he wrote creatively using symbolism to make remarks on society. I feel that in my transformation I have taken Wilde's symbolism a step further. The responses I got were ones of intrigue and contemplation. Instead of simply enjoying the text, people would ask questions and share their ideas. Though some may argue that the true potential of the piece can only be enjoyed by people with knowledge of the base text, the responses I have received make me think otherwise. The conversations on the consequences of our sins, the sanctity of life, even the possible supernatural elements of the universe, give me confidence in the success of my transformation. 1865 Total word count - 3873 ...read more.

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