What are Wilde(TM)s dramatic purposes in his presentation of Mrs Allonby?

What are Wilde's dramatic purposes in his presentation of Mrs Allonby? Throughout the play Wilde uses many different techniques and themes in order to present the dramatic purpose of Mrs Allonby. The first way he does this is to emphasis her chosen role in the play as that of the female dandy, a role that is mirrored in a male sense by Lord Illingworth. The first example of this attitude comes near the beginning of the play when Lady Hunstanton comments on the beautiful state of the countryside however Mrs Allonby shows her admiration for the scenery but not the lifestyle that comes with it 'I feel sure that if I lived in the country for six months I should become so unsophisticated that no one would take the slightest notice of me' This comment is a typical example of the dramatic purpose of Mrs Allonby as it shows her classic arrogance and feeling of superiority as she is suggesting that living in the country is below her and is a demeaning suggestion. The connection between the two dandy's Mrs Allonby and Lord Illingworth is evident towards the end of the scene when they are left alone on stage and undertake a flirtatious contest of intelligence initiated by Mrs Allonby which signifies to a large extent the way she behaves throughout the whole play and why her purpose is a dramatic one. The flirtatious banter adds a different dimension to the play and represents the

  • Word count: 921
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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What Does Chapter 5 Add To The Novel?

What Does Chapter 5 Add To The Novel? The novel, "The Picture of Dorian Gray", was written in 1891 by Oscar Wilde. In the opening chapters of the novel, we meet the central character of Dorian Gray and two other main characters, Lord Henry Wotton and Basil Hallward. The opening few chapters focus on mainly these three people, however, once we reach chapter five, the novel shifts focus into another direction and focuses on the Vane family. We are introduced to Sibyl, the young actress Dorian is in love with. We also meet Sibyl's brother, James, who is protective of his sister and wary of the new love in her life, and their mother, Mrs Vane, a woman with whom theatre has overtaken her life. Chapter five explores different themes, such as Aestheticism vs. reality, and for the first time we are given multiple perceptions of the main character Dorian Gray. Chapter five is important to the novel as we are introduced to the new key figure of Sibyl Vane. As we learn about her, she becomes a reality to the reader. She is no longer just a person who was spoken about previously, Wilde now gives her depth, while creating understanding and sympathy to her character. This is done in different ways. Sibyl is introduced immediately in the chapter, "Mother, mother, I am so happy! Whispered the girl...I am so happy ... and you must be happy too!" The fact that she is described initially as a,

  • Word count: 1250
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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What Does The Reader Learn About The Three Main Characters In The Opening Chapter Of, "The Picture Of Dorian Gray"?

What Does The Reader Learn About The Three Main Characters In The Opening Chapter Of, "The Picture Of Dorian Gray"? Oscar Wilde wrote the novel, "The Picture of Dorian Gray", in 1891. When first published in, "Lippincott's Monthly Magazine", it was criticised for being immoral and provoked a response in Britain. It follows the story of young, Dorian Gray, who when realises his good looks will eventually leave him after witnessing the result of a portrait of himself, he exchanges his soul for endless youth and beauty. In the opening chapter, we are made known of three main characters, Basil Hallward, the artist who paints Dorian's portrait, Lord Henry Wotton, Basil's witty friend who eventually becomes close with Dorian and the main character himself, Dorian Gray, a handsome young gentlemen of society. The first chapter starts off in the residence of Basil Hallward. At once we can tell that the man inhabiting here is of an artistic nature, the place described as, "the studio", a typical place where artists work. We can tell that Basil takes care of his home, it's, "filled with the rich odour of roses... the heavy scent of the lilac... delicate perfume", giving the impression of a very rich, fragrant home, filled with elegance. We are then introduced to Basil himself, "whose sudden disappearance some years ago caused, at the time, some public excitement and gave rise to so

  • Word count: 1461
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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Remind yourself of the conversation between Gerald and Mrs Arbuthnot between lines 104 and 265 of act IV What is the importance of this section in the context of the whole play?

Remind yourself of the conversation between Gerald and Mrs Arbuthnot between lines 104 and 265 of act IV What is the importance of this section in the context of the whole play? The conversation between Gerald and Mrs Arbuthnot during the extract is one of the most important and dramatic events throughout the entire play. The audience finds out Gerald's desire for Lord Illingworth and Mrs Arbuthnot to marry so that his parents can be reunited once again in what he believes would be an ideal situation. Extra importance and drama surrounds this scene as Wilde considered it necessary to remove it in order to gain a license to perform the play. The way Wilde presents the characters of Gerald and Mrs Arbuthnot throughout the play is extremely important and this conversation typifies the way that he achieves this not only in the extract but throughout the entire play. From the beginning of the extract it is clear that the actions of Mrs Arbuthnot dictate the way that Gerald lives his life. This is all the more important and dramatic because in 19th century Victorian society once a boy comes of age then he would be the dominant figure over the mother however the audience witnesses on a number of occasions the way that Gerald is still entirely dependant on his mother and no more than in this extract, making it one of the most dramatic and important in the context of the play as a

  • Word count: 904
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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The Picture of Dorian Gray - plot summary

The Picture of Dorian Gray Before the Book: * The preface of The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde is a series of aphorisms that deal with beauty, art, artists, and critics. They talk about beauty and how it should be admired without trying to find fault or meaning in it. One of the lines that most stuck me was, "There is no such thing as a moral or an immoral book. Books are well written, or badly written. That is all" (Wilde 2). I know this book received a lot of criticism when it was first published, so this quote from Wilde sustains these notions. Wilde also stresses that one should find beautiful meanings in beautiful things, but that trying to find a deeper meaning is dangerous. From the preface and what I know about the book, it is going to deal with a lot with the purpose of art, hedonism, and superficiality. * I know the novel is about a man who longs to stay young and beautiful forever. It was scandalous when it came out. I also know Oscar Wilde wrote mainly plays and short stories. He was put on trial for reasons I do not know and exiled. Chapters 1-4 * Summary: The novel starts off with Basil Hallward, a reclusive painter, entertaining his friend Lord Henry Wotton. Lord Henry admires one of Basil's latest paintings and asks who the subject is. Basil tells him that it is Dorian Gray and goes on to tell Lord Henry how they met. Basil described Dorian as

  • Word count: 2790
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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In the Picture of Dorian Gray, Oscar Wilde portrays through the painting the contrast between seeing life as a piece of art, where a person is completely detached, or embracing the ugliness of life, which includes selfishness, vanity, and degeneration.

Embracing the Ugly with the Beauty The Picture of Dorian Gray argues the idea of life. Lord Henry explains to Dorian that he should be an observer of life, like a work of art. On one hand, Dorian must fully experience life but also must be detached from it like a spectator. Lord Henry makes it seem that this detachment is essential to him avoiding the pain of the life. The other idea of life represented in the story is to fully accept life for what it is and recognize the ugliness of sin. Dorian's innocent mind is corrupted by the influence of Lord Henry and this influence leads to a long downward spiral for Dorian throughout the book. Dorian contemplates both aspects of living life and by the end, finally figures out the reality of life. In the Picture of Dorian Gray, Oscar Wilde portrays through the painting the contrast between seeing life as a piece of art, where a person is completely detached, or embracing the ugliness of life, which includes selfishness, vanity, and degeneration. Lord Henry raises the idea of experiencing life as a person would a piece of art. To live this way becomes very complicated because Lord Henry explains that the person must be completely involved and put his whole being into it but at the same time remain a spectator. Art becomes a complete example of this because a viewer examining a painting must totally put himself into the

  • Word count: 2062
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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In the play 'The Importance of Being Earnest", Oscar Wilde Presents a Society That is Far from 'Earnest'

In the play 'The Importance of Being Earnest", Oscar Wilde Presents a Society That is Far from 'E(a)rnest' As people learn to 'Bunbury' more and more they find that life becomes easier to live with so long as they remember the untruth that makes up their alter-egos. The infamous 'Bunbury' is utilised for the least selfish of charitable purposes; he saves the feelings of the arrogant and improves the diet and social life of all of his friends. As he lies on his death bed, he is a true friend who has the good grace to fall ill at your whim and the good humour not to join you at the Savoy for a steak dinner (or expect you at his house when you profess a desire to visit to your aunt). No, all he asks is for you to remember him and change how he is feeling (unlike some people you won't have a nasty shock about your being his namesake) when it suits you... you wouldn't want to miss your chance to DJ a proper Victorian get together would you? Or people might not listen to your tales of cucumbers and 'ready money'. Lane seems to be one of the more interesting cameos in the play, he will back his master trough any lie or misfortune as long as he still receives his wage - you never get the impression that he would not leave his master if 'Agly' fell completely from the good graces of Lady Bracknell and into the dreaded disrepute of poor health becoming unable to provide wage. Lane

  • Word count: 1391
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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A Picture Of Dorian Gray - from the Perspective of the Picture. (with commentary)

Nathan Gornall Candidate Number: 3076 Center Number: 50415 English Literature and Language Coursework Original Texts by Oscar Wilde English Text Transformation Coursework This radio transcript is a transformation of "A Picture of Dorian Gray" by Oscar Wilde, from the perspective of the painting. Transformation CAST: * Main voice (the picture of Dorian Gray) * Lord Henry (male speaker) * Basil (male) * Dorian (male) * Maid 1 (female) * Maid 2 (female) Scene 1 VOICE: What's this? A thought? I am thinking? How am I thinking? I must have a mind! But if I have a mind, I must be a...thing. What am I? Ooh, hang on, I can see something, I can see something! I have an eye! Who is that? What is that man doing? Oh...no...stop that! Stop rubbing my eye with that brush! I have only had an eye for fifteen seconds and you are trying to paint over it. Oh, hang on. Ohhh now I see, you are making it beautiful! Yes, that eyebrow, a little bit more of an angle. Yes yes yes! Wonderful! Gosh I am a good looking eye! (pause, sombre tone) One eye. I am a passive observer to a man with a paintbrush. Is this to be my life's purpose? (voice becomes inspired) If it is, I will achieve my goal to great success; I will be the greatest observer of a man with a brush this world has ever seen! So come on man, get ready to be watched with the eagle stare of my eye. (Pause) Oh no, where

  • Word count: 3977
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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Reread An Extract From Chapter Sixteen, Which Begins, "A Cold Rain Began To Fall, And The Blurred Street-Lamp Looked Ghastly In The Dripping Mist" as Far As, "... Said Dorian, Turning On His Heel, And Going Slowly Down The Street." Discuss How Wilde Prese

Reread An Extract From Chapter Sixteen, Which Begins, "A Cold Rain Began To Fall, And The Blurred Street-Lamp Looked Ghastly In The Dripping Mist" as Far As, "... Said Dorian, Turning On His Heel, And Going Slowly Down The Street." Discuss How Wilde Presents Dorian Gray In This Extract And At One Other Point In The Novel. Oscar Wilde wrote the novel, "The Picture of Dorian Gray", in 1891. When first published in, "Lippincott's Monthly Magazine", it was criticised for being immoral and provoked a response in Britain. It follows the story of young, Dorian Gray, who undertakes a journey into darkness. In Chapter Sixteen, Dorian is travelling to an opium den, in which he further indulges in his sins. It is at this point in novel in which his past catches up with him, but being the devious character that he is, he manages to lie his way out of the perilous situation. In it the first time in this chapter in which Dorian is presented in an abnormal surrounding, one which is unlike any of the other exquisite environments in which he has been portrayed previously. This change in environment indicates to the reader that we will be seeing a different side to Dorian. Previously, he had been surrounded by luxury and beauty, but now in this real raw environment, it indicates to us that Wilde will be unearthing the façade that is Dorian Gray, depicting another viewpoint of the main

  • Word count: 1331
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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How do the country characters cast light on the pretentions of society as exposed in The Importance of Being Ernest?

How do the 'country characters' cast light on the pretentions of society as exposed in 'the importance of being Ernest'? The country characters are contrasted against the characters from the town. The individuals who lived in the country were portrayed as being simple, righteous and unintelligent by people living in towns in Victorian England. However in this essay I will discuss how Wilde depicts both groups in 'The Importance of Being Ernest'. The first time the setting changes to the countryside, the scene begins with Cicely and Miss Prism (her governess) starting a German lesson. This gives the impression that the majority of Cecily's time is occupied with learning. Which contradicts the impression we may have about people from the country being uneducated. Gwendolyn also adds to this by saying 'Mamma whose views on education are remarkably strict' however there is a paradox to our expectations when her mother states that she does not agree with 'anything that tampers with natural ignorance' and that 'education produces no effect'. When Gwendolyn meets Cicely they both end up thinking that they are engaged to Earnest Worthing, when they discuss this they treat marriage as an extremely trivial matter by saying 'Their must be some slight error,' and 'some misconception'. Earlier on Gwendolyn also states that 'men propose for practice' again trivialising the matter.

  • Word count: 600
  • Level: AS and A Level
  • Subject: English
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