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Act 3 scene 3 is a pivotal scene in the play Othello. How does it build on previous events and foreshadow events still to come?

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Introduction

Act 3 scene 3 is a pivotal scene in the play Othello. How does it build on previous events and foreshadow events still to come? I have been studying the play Othello, written by William Shakespeare. As part of my coursework, I intend to analyze Act 3 scene 3 of the play as a pivotal scene. This lengthy scene is the most significant throughout the play, as it builds on previous events, and foreshadows events still to come. The leading characters within this spectacular and well written play are Othello: who is also known as "the Moor", a black African prince living in a European, colour-prejudiced society, who is lead by Iago into thinking that his wife is unfaithful to him. Desdemona: Othello's white Venetian devoted wife, however due to a cunning Iago, is suspected of infidelity and killed by her husband. Iago: Othello's ensign (standard bearer), who deviously plants suspicion in Othello's mind against his faithful wife. Cassio: Othello's lieutenant, who is also manipulated by Iago, who wished for the position of "the Moor's" lieutenant. Emilia: Desdemona's maid and Iago's wife, who is loyal to both her mistress and husband, however she is also killed due to her loyalty to her husband. Roderigo: A Venetian, who is also in love with Desdemona, but is systematically cheated by Iago, and Brabantio: Desdemona's father, who is outraged when he hears of his daughter's marriage to a black man. We first come across Act 3 scene 3 building on previous events when Desdemona reconciles Cassio and assures him that she will do everything she can to make her husband reinstate him to his former position as Othello's lieutenant. "Be thou assur'd, good Cassio, I will do all my abilities in thy behalf." This is the irony in her character that her sense of goodness will eventually be the cause of her death, as Othello starts to suspect her. ...read more.

Middle

Emilia was seen to be loyal throughout the whole play, to both her husband and mistress. This loyalty to her husband was the main cause of her death in the final act, as she gave the ultimate proof of Desdemona's innocence to her husband, in desperation of his approval, and as he had requested for it, which shows that she was being loyal to her husband as she did exactly as he required. This one mistake, which was done unknowingly also led to her mistress' death, as it was this one piece of evidence which could have saved her from her brutal death. The hatred we see towards Cassio in Act 3 scene 3 foreshadows Othello's loss in friends, as cassio was a close friend of many others, therefore when Iago's real character is unveiled in the final act, everyone takes Othello to be a very low person as he was manipulated by Iago, into thinking that his wife, who was in actual fact innocent, was being unfaithful to him. Roderigo who was also close to Othello was killed due to Iago. Desdemona's murder was also caused due to the hatred towards Cassio, and this lead to the dismissal of his position, as everyone felt that Othello was not worthy of carrying out his job with respect. Othello's friends, his wife and his reputation were his life, which he lost due to his insecurities, and manipulation by the deceitful Iago. In conclusion the fact that so much significant and crucial parts take place in Act 3 scene 3 proves that it is very important to the rest of the play, as it really starts to develop the plot and themes we have seen growing throughout earlier scenes. This is the scene when we see Iago has successfully manipulated Othello into believing that Desdemona has not been faithful to him, this is very significant to the rest of the play as it affects everything Othello feels and says from this point onwards. ...read more.

Conclusion

Shakespeare uses this technique to show us that Othello has lost his confidence and is no longer self-assured. As he becomes more and more angry his control through his speech begins to slip, no longer does he speak in long flowing sentences but now in exclamations, which hints at his loss of capability to loose his temper. He is also speaking in a similar way to Iago and this may symbolise that he has come to think in the same manner. These images show the audience the depth of Othello's jealousy, the woman he loved he now criticize. However the most effective method that Iago uses to convince Othello of Desdemona's infidelity is by using one of Othello's most treasured possessions and telling Othello that his wife, Desdemona has given it away to her lover, Cassio. The handkerchief was the first gift he gave to Desdemona, so it possesses enormous sentimental value to Othello. Finding out that Desdemona has given it away shows her as inimical. It must have hurt and angered him, after all the woman he loves and is married to has given away without a care for him, would almost certainly anger him, for in Othello's mind she has thought the handkerchief to be a meaningless piece of cloth. This is enough proof for Othello to be convinced that Iago is telling the truth and for him to kill both Desdemona and Cassio. ?? ?? ?? ?? This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ English coursework: Othello This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ Saira Javed 10CThis document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ This document was downloaded from Coursework.Info - The UK's Coursework Database - http://www.coursework.info/ ...read more.

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