• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

analysis of 'nutting' by wordsworth

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

.Write an essay of which you analyse the poem 'Nutting' by William Wordsworth Throughout 'Nutting' Wordsworth uses many different techniques to help with the development of its meaning and effects. Written in the first viewpoint, it is allegorical with its focus being on a young boy going out to collect nuts, dealing with the past of the outing framed by the adult's memories with nature teaching and guiding him. One of the leading themes in Wordsworth's poetry was of childhood and nature, as seen in other poems such as 'There was a Boy', 'We are seven' and 'Lucy Gray', showing his interest in the relationship between the two. (Blades, 2004, p.7Written in iambic pentameter we see that 'at somewhere around ten syllables, the English poetic line is at its most relaxed and manageable' (Fenton, 2002, p.56) giving room for the variations seen in the poem, such as the short opening line to be used with great effect to the overall feel and meaning. The poem opens with a dramatic pause, which also creates a visual impact; '________________ It seems a day', indicating that the poem is reflective and immortalised in his memory with it being a day 'which cannot die' (line 2). ...read more.

Middle

with the use of enjambment helping to make the poem flow freely. The use of caesura in line 19, 'A virgin scene - A little while I stood' creates a pause, slowing the poem back down, allowing the reader to reflect on the image being created. The man remembers the admiration he felt when he came across the 'dear nook'. (line 14) This is emphasised by the effect of 'breathing with such suppression of the heart' (line 20), a lyrical line which with no punctuation, makes you read faster. The use of the trochee at the beginning of the line with 'breathing' places a greater emphasis on the breath-taking feeling it creates. On reaching the nook, he 'eyed the banquet' (lines 22&23), a metaphor for the bounty of nature, creating an image of the fruitful tree. The enjambment used 'Where fairy water-breaks do murmur on for ever' (lines 31&32) helps the words to flow just like the flowing of a river. The use of the word 'fairy' (line 31) is also reminiscent of a childlike imagination, again linking to the theme of innocence within the poem. ...read more.

Conclusion

and 'been bless'd' (line 26) all brought together by the mention of this Spirit. Wordsworth believed that his poetry would be 'alive with metaphors' (Romantic Writings: An Anthology, p.88, line 276) linking in with the theme of nature being the live 'Spirit' seen in the final line of the poem. Reading this poem at face value we see the story of a boy going out to collect nuts, but Wordsworth cleverly uses the various techniques mentioned to create deeper meanings and feelings within the poem. As a Romantic writer, he was influenced by 'Rousseau's suggestion that civilisation had corrupted humanity's original nobility' (Furniss, and Bath, 2007, p.187) and was concerned with the innocence of children and of connecting back to nature, something we see throughout 'Nutting'. By using blank verse the subject of the poem is elevated, showing its importance. (Approaching Poetry, p.14) The techniques used help the reader to gain more from the poem, seeing deeper into the meanings perhaps not seen at first, emphasising the importance of nature to all who read it. The imagery of nature being used is that of a place of sanctuary to return to which we are being invited to share in the experience. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level William Wordsworth section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level William Wordsworth essays

  1. Form and meaning of The Daffodils by W.Wordsworth and Miracle on St.David’s Day by ...

    one line and running onto finish on the next line, such as, "A big, mild man is tenderly led...to his chair." This pattern helps to reveal the stages of the miracle because it flows and looks like a poem but sound like prose.

  2. How do poems 'Daffodils' by William Wordsworth and 'Miracle on St. David's Day' by ...

    they are once again "are flame", it is as if the candle is lit. This could be seen as a symbol of hope. As well, the last stanza is not a 5 line block like the others, it also has a variety of different number of syllables in each line,

  1. Write about the importance of memory in Wordsworth's "Daffodils" and Clarke's "Miracle on St. ...

    After all the describing of the magical and romantic atmosphere, the reader feels pessimistic that something is going to change the whole mood of the poem. The reader then discovers that nothing terrible happens but the "but" was only to shame the waves, as the daffodils were more effective "out-did the sparkling waves in glee".

  2. English essay about Worthwords

    feel for each other and how these feelings are affected by nature and the world surrounding them. He shows this by expressing things around him such as the moon, the hills and the cottage, which contributes to the thoughts and passion to slide into his head.

  1. In your opinion, how successfully does Lyrical Ballads capture the hour of feeling?

    Mothers who have lost their children (which was a common phenomenon at the time due to famine and sickness) would respond emotionally to "We are Seven" and "The Thorn"; families who have lost their men to war, would sympathize with "the female vagrant" and to the readers who never experience

  2. Differences and Similarities Between Coleridge and Wordsworth Concerning People's Relationship to Nature

    He reached the highest feeling ; then nature calms down and becomes good again. At the beginning, nature is threatening, but at the end, watching the beautiful sea snake saves the mariner and nature is forgiving. Nature brings him rain to quench his thirst and the wind pushes the ship to the English coast.

  1. Demonstrate the persistence of Wordsworthian ideal of country folk, childhood and natural education in ...

    Hers is the good mother, the mother earth in Wordsworth's poems. The respect for her and her kind shines through in the text as it does in the poems, through the voice of the narrator. She is again a considered equal in the narrator's eyes to all who she comes into contact with.

  2. In Lucy Gray and There was a boy Wordsworth examines childhood in similar ways ...

    this death is somewhat ambiguous in the poem it could be argued that this is the literal death of the boy due to the ?silence? and the dark, bleak images created in his mind from this.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work