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Analysis of 'Strange Meeting' by Wilfred Owen.

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Introduction

Analysis of 'Strange Meeting' by Wilfred Owen 'Strange Meeting' by Wilfred Owen is a poem about a soldier in the First World War who makes contact with the spirit of a dead soldier's soul. After reading this poem, you know that the poet is against the war, and that war is somewhat worse than hell. The poem begins with the relief of a soldier as he escapes the war. Later on in the poem, the soldier meets the spirit of a dead soldier, and that is when he realises where he is. The spirit tells the soldier that if you go into war you are simply wasting your life. It also mentions the cruelty and harshness of war, and what it's like to be there. Although the poem is almost completely a monologue, there is some dialogue and narration too. Narration is to be found at the beginning, as the soldier leaves the battlefield and approaches the spirits of the dead soldiers, until he communicates with one of them. ...read more.

Middle

This adds more effect to the rhythmic beat. Enjambment is also used to speed up certain parts of the poem, such as 'To miss the march of this retreating world Into vain........' Alliteration is the last literary device used, as an initial rhyme is to be found too. The poem has an ironic and bitter tone. The spirit's life was taken away from him, having no fulfilment before death. He describes how he had missed out on life. He describes that war is worse than hell, and that he was willing to give everything to live a nice life, but was willing to give nothing to war, as Wilfred Owen has complete negative thoughts about war in this poem, as well as all his other poems. The monologue spoken by the soul speaks about only the bad things of war. Allegory and imagery are used in the poem to produce a visual image with a dark tone. In the beginning, the scene is set by describing hell, which immediately tells us that he poem is going to be about the terrors of war, and is also going to be quite sad and sorrowful. ...read more.

Conclusion

'I mean the truth untold, the pity of war, the pity war distilled.' The poet is trying to tell us that the soldiers cannot explain what war was like, and that the real truth was not being told, as it should be. The truth in fact is 'the pity of war', and Owen is trying to convey this message in the poem, because he feels it's his duty to tell everyone the terrors of war. He's trying to help civilians understand the evil of war, because he believes that those who embrace war will go to hell. Wilfred Owen wants to bring an end to war and all the suffering once and for all. In conclusion, I think that Owen, in this poem is hoping that war will in the future make people show pity and think about what it actually achieves for mankind. He shows that war does not move the human race on, but moves it backwards. He believes that through knowledge, we can learn to avoid war, and if everyone knows about the reality of war, it can be a thing of the past. ...read more.

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Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

3 star(s)

This essay focuses on the what rather than the how and why and as a result it is a very superficial analysis. When completing an analytical essay, it is important to make a point, support it with evidence from the text and then explain the effects that have been created by the poet.

3 Stars

Marked by teacher Laura Gater 09/07/2013

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