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By close Examination of Some of the images, explore Owen's view of the shell shocked soldiers.

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Introduction

By close Examination of Some of the images, explore Owen's view of the shell shocked soldiers. Wilfred Owen fought throughout the First World War until the last week when he unfortunately died in combat. He must have seen many people in shock from the horrors and destruction of war and that is why he composed a poem about shell shocked soldiers. He said this about his poems: "My subject is War and the pity of war" this poem is another example of this. It is apparent that Owen believed that the men are no longer human and that they are in fact called "these". Since loosing their sanity he no longer thought that the people he saw were anything he could recognise; "Who are these?" He was obviously shocked by what he had observed. He used the word "twilight" to set an atmosphere for the rest of the poem. It shows what condition the soldiers were kept in because it was a dark area; moreover it gives the whole place a spooky and chilling aura. Owen described the physical features of the shell shocked soldiers at the beginning poem in a cruel approach. ...read more.

Middle

This might symbolise the noise of the shell shocked men, or even Owen was making a flashback of war on the front line with the image of a gas attack and soldiers trying to get air in their lungs. There is also an oxymoron in the sentence which shows that he was confused about why the men were in that current state of health. The most significant quotation which really makes the reader imagine what Owen would have seen is"Awful falseness of set-smiling corpses". This image makes the reader think deeply about how much the shell shocked victims were disturbed by the war. There are many words and expressions in this poem which were chosen to make sound and also to put an image into the mind of the reader. Often these words make the flashback of the battlefield in which the men became shell shocked from. The phrase "batter of guns shatter" is an internal rhyme that gives a machine gun fire sound showing pain to the reader. The whole quotation of "Batter of guns and shatter of flying muscles" gives a sound of war description. ...read more.

Conclusion

In line twenty seven the poem says "Snatching after us who smote them brother". Owen wrote this because he thought that the mad people were blaming the living (sane) for what had happened to them. In the last line it says, "Pawing us who dealt them war and madness." This excerpt could have many meanings such as the shell shocked victims wanting revenge for those who made them turn insane. Further more, Owen is emphasising the pompous leaders as if they were the people inspecting the hospital realising what they had done. Of course, they had no idea of what "hellish" orders they "dealt" to those who fought in The Great War because they were not at the front line. The whole idea of seeing mental people meant that Owen could not describe the situation in plain English, everything is described metaphorically. The whole impression of the mental people was that they were in a nightmare (Surreal) which they had not yet awaken from. He included the horror, pity and after effects of war to show the reader how "helpless" men could no longer cope with "Carnage incomparable" which meant that, in the end, they just broke down. ?? ?? ?? ?? Andrew Tait Page 1 10/05/2007 ...read more.

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