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Compare the use of similar themes and language devices in both 'Araby' and 'Eveline' by James Joyce.

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Introduction

James Joyce uses similar themes and language devices in both 'Araby' and 'Eveline.' Although this is so, there are also important differences to be noted. Joyce wrote these stories over one hundred years ago but yet we can still relate to the issues covered in the modern world today. James Joyce could have written these short stories as an inspiration from his own background or based them on the events happening in Dublin at that time. These stories were written as a new century was beginning. The people of Dublin soon realised the sense of hope for the new century had faded due to the fall and death of Parnell. This relates to both of the stories as a sense of false hope is given in each. Joyce sensed exhaustion and emptiness in Dublin and these are also the emotional results in both stories. In 'Araby,' the story is written in first person narrative. This gives you a chance to get a detailed point of view of the boy's feelings. This makes you more emotionally involved in the story, as it becomes more convincing if you understand the range of emotions the boy is going through. ...read more.

Middle

He realises at the end that his life will probably be like this forever and the way he let the girl down could fail him in everything else he tries to do. Just like 'Araby,' 'Eveline' has the exact same themes including another one escape. In 'Eveline,' she experiences blind love. This is blind love as she only really finds Frank as a way to escape her family. She only really wants Frank as a solution to her problems. Frank is offering Eveline a new life with him away from her family. He would provide her with a home, and a chance to start again. This blind love binds with the escape she needs. Love is a very strong way to describe Eveline's relationship with Frank. She may only actually like him but feel that she is in love as she regards Frank as the only way to escape from her family problems. Family is more important in this story. Eveline made a promise to her mother to keep her family together when she was dying. The quote to suggest this is, 'Strange that it should come that very night to remind her of the promise to her mother, her promise to keep the home together as long as she could.' ...read more.

Conclusion

She wanted to know what life away from her family was like, but in the end family came first. The language devices used in each story are very similar. For example, personification is a key device: 'An uninhabited house stood at the blind end, detached from its neighbours. The other houses, conscious of decent live, gazed at one another with brown imperturbable faces.' This line is used at the start of 'Araby' to convey the mood of the neighbourhood. Rhetorical questions are used frequently in both. An example from 'Eveline' is, 'Why should she be unhappy?' This line shows that even though there is a third person narration, we can still experience her feelings. Both stories have a modern relevance that we can interact with. In 'Araby,' the boy experiences momentary infatuation and this is something everyone experiences in some point of their life. In 'Eveline,' she feels that she has to escape from her family and run away with the man of her dreams. Do many women not dream of this today? In conclusion, I think that both these stories were both very similar as the themes and language devices are essential in both. It has a very good relevance to the modern world and the writer conveys different advantages by using different narration techniques in both. Both stories were successful! Amie Keenan ...read more.

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