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Discuss Shakespeare's dramatic presentations of the Duke in Act I of 'Measure for Measure'. What do you find to be interesting and / or problematic about his character?

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Introduction

Discuss Shakespeare's dramatic presentations of the Duke in Act I of 'Measure for Measure'. What do you find to be interesting and / or problematic about his character? Shakespeare presents the Duke in "Measure for Measure" as an authorative figure, as he is highly respected and referred to as "my Lord". In the first instance, we get the impression that the Duke is portrayed to be a public body. He seems very connected to his people and comes across as a very superior leader to them. He is generally aware of the situation of his city the fact that he mentions " Of government the properties to unfold Would seem in me t'affect speech and discourse" Act I Scene I These are one of the Dukes very first words in the play; his speech gives us an impression of the plays central theme, which has to do with "government, properties, and speeches". ...read more.

Middle

The Duke the falls into a dilemma and comes to a conclusion that the person in charge should be Angelo "For you must know, we have with special soul elected him our absence, to supply lent him our terror, dressed him with our love and given his deputation all organs" Act I Scene I The Duke then leaves the City of Vienna in the capable hands of Angelo and perhaps to test if his "worth is able" or probably to see how a state should be ruled. However the most interesting thing about the Duke is in Act I we get the impression that through out the play the Duke acts as a arbiter of justice. The character of the Duke helps the audience understand the play; it also creates suspense and adds hindsight view, which only the audience can see. ...read more.

Conclusion

while he conceals he identity as a Duke and turns into a friar, this emphasizes the view that the Duke is kind of a political figure. All his disguise and hiding from the crowd exposes him to be a rather as he "Loves the people, But do not like to stage me to their eyes" Act I Scene I Never the less the Duke is most to blame for the state of the city and he is equally as responsible for the acts in play then anyone else. Although the Duke is represented to be a hierarchical character that is at the very apex of the stage he is just as low in moral values as the other characters. This is what makes him a to a certain extent an interesting character. Vishal Chita " Measure for Measure" by William Shakespeare ...read more.

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