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Hamlet. In the play Hamlet by William Shakespeare, the audience may perceive the main player to be nave and sympathise with him due to this shortcoming.

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Introduction

'Hamlet' by William Shakespeare is a play in which the eponymous prince may be considered na�ve. His unfortunate naivety helps to convey the major themes of revenge, misogyny and appearance versus reality. It also helps to evoke sympathy from the audience and directs the audience to where Shakespeare wants their allegiances should lie for the climax of the play. In the play 'Hamlet' by William Shakespeare, the audience may perceive the main player to be na�ve and sympathise with him due to this shortcoming. For example, at the beginning of the play, Hamlet loved and trusted the 'fair Ophelia'. In return for his trust, she betrayed him to Claudius, Hamlet's arch enemy by agreeing to the spying of a conversation between Hamlet and herself. As a result of being na�ve in his trust for Ophelia, the daughter of Polonius, he was betrayed and left genuinely disturbed: 'God hath given you a face and you make yourselves another.' Hamlet here is showing his anger at her disloyalty by accusing her and all women of being duplicitous, revealing the sporadic theme of misogyny. ...read more.

Middle

For example, Hamlet seemed committed to revenge his father's 'most unnatural murder' but procrastinated and feared the repercussions: 'I do not know why yet I live to say 'This thing's to do,' sith I have cause, and will, and strength, and means to do't' Hamlet here arouses the audience's sympathy through his continuous procrastination and also through his na�ve perception of the world. Shakespeare successfully depicts Hamlet as the victim in this situation by continually reminding the audience of his inability to cope with the moral dilemma he is faced with. This effectively evokes the audience's sympathy and also further polarises Claudius and the other antagonists from vulnerable Hamlet. Arguably, the main focus of the play is Hamlet's struggle to resolve within himself to exact revenge for his father's 'most unnatural murder' and to cope with his predicament. This is illustrated through his philosophical debate in the famous 'To be or not to be' soliloquy: 'Thus conscience does make cowards of us all'. ...read more.

Conclusion

Shakespeare here successfully arouses sympathy for Hamlet through his change in character and also reinforces the alignment of the audience for the denouement. Also, all of the main players are gathered around death in this scene, foreshadowing what is to come and building up to a climax. In addition, Hamlet's naivety is further emphasised by the characterisation of Laertes; Laertes acts more like a typical revenge hero and is therefore seen as a foil to him. Laertes brushes aside all of the moral hurdles that have been preventing the protagonist from revenging his father's death. Shakespeare encapsulates this dramatic function through Hamlet himself: 'For by the image of my cause, I see the portraiture of his.' Shakespeare skillfully crafts Hamlet so he himself realises his faults, intensifying the audience's compassion for him and successfully conveying the main theme of revenge and retribution. In conclusion, the naivety of prince Hamlet plays a significant part in conveying the main themes of revenge, misogyny and appearance versus reality. Despite his tragic infirmity, Shakespeare successfully manages to create a degree of sympathy of the prince in order to align the audience's reaction to the main themes and the play as a whole. ...read more.

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