• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Happy is England Now

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

'Happy is England Now' Sophie Thompson The poem 'Happy is England Now' was written by John Freeman in 1914 at the beginning of the First World War. The poem shows significant evidence of patriotism and propaganda which were common in the early war poems before the realities of the brutal war were known about. John Freeman was a Georgian poet who was influenced by inter-war literacy circles. The poem has a formal structure of four stanzas and has a regular syntax of six lines in each stanza with lengthy sentences. In the opening line we immediately get a sense of the tremendous patriotism in the poem 'There is not anything more wonderful, Than a great people moving towards the deep' the phrase has a patriotic attitude of proud, glorified people sailing out to the sea to war. Freeman uses the word deep to describe the journey to war as an unknown adventure which is supported in the third line 'Of an unguessed and unfeared future,' The phrase is suggesting that the soldiers are curious to explore and do not fear for what is to some. ...read more.

Middle

The statement 'faithfullest children' suggests the soldiers have belief in England as it is their duty to fight which has a deeply patriotic tone. Freeman then writes about the mixed feelings for war. 'Ev'n the warm beauty of this spring and summer, That turns to bitterness turns then to gladness, Since for this England the beloved ones died. The phrase suggests the power of England with its warm beauty which has a sense of patriotism. There is bitterness as war comes even though there is gladness and glorification as fighting for England turns to honour and glory. The opening line of the third stanza again repeats the title 'Happy is England in the brave that die, For the wrongs not hers so sternly hers.' The phrase is implying that England is deeply grateful for the men who die fighting for England and that she is not wrong to go to war it is having to fight because of an aggressor. ...read more.

Conclusion

In the ultimate phrase Freeman uses idealism that England is now purer as the men have sacrificed their lives to save the beauty and the goodness of there cherished home 'There's not a nobleness of heart, hand, brain, But Shines the purer; happiest is England now, In those that fight, and watch with pride and tears.' Freeman is implying that no matter what people were like in the past England will be a better, purer place. The use of the word 'tears' is implying the recognition that the war has caused sorrow however it is worthwhile to protect the beauty of our mother England. The poem 'Happy is England' has a tremendous patriotic sense behind the fear of the unknown future which drives it on. Freeman writes the poem which such passion and the theme of idealism runs throughout the poem. I enjoyed the poem as it had a balance of the positive and negative aspects of the war, unlike other early war poems. It uses a symbolism of the natural England which portrays the idea of home of the soldiers and expresses the beauty and how we value our loving England. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level War Poetry section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

4 star(s)

This is a competent review of the poem, perhaps concentrating too much on textual analysis. This aspect is very thorough, however, and suitable quotations are used to illustrate the points made. Structure is quickly dismissed in paragraph 2, yet comment could have included the use of a regular metre and the purpose that this serves. More could also have been said about poetic devices, such as the personification of "England". What is the purpose of this? What would it have meant to the readers at the time?

Structure is good. Sentences are mostly well-controlled, though there is some ponderous introduction of quotations which could have been more effectively incorporated in the flow of the writing. The final paragraph could do more to sum up the overall argument of the essay.

4 stars.

Marked by teacher Jeff Taylor 10/06/2013

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level War Poetry essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Compare the presentation of the psychological effects of war on the individual in 'Regeneration' ...

    5 star(s)

    remember once at school he caught some chaps in study with a bottle of whiskey. Lord! The roof nearly blew off." Through this distinct change in the character, Sherriff portrays the way in which war affected men psychologically, how characteristics of men could drastically change during time of war.

  2. Marked by a teacher

    Explain how the poets of Happy is England Now in the anthology Up the ...

    4 star(s)

    Hardy and Freeman, on the other hand, never went to war as they were too old, so they had to write their poems from second hand knowledge; indeed Hardy wrote an earlier poem, "Charge of the Light Brigade" solely from information according to a newspaper article.

  1. Marked by a teacher

    The causes of world war one

    4 star(s)

    A lightened version was also used on aircraft. Machine guns were perhaps the most monstrous weapons of World war one. Barbed wire One of the most prolific obstacles that the advancing allied troops faced was the mass of barbed wire, which the Germans had put in front of their trenches.

  2. Marked by a teacher

    Presentation of In Flanders Fields - script

    3 star(s)

    * We now know the true and horrible reality of Flanders fields, and the beautiful imagery now seems almost out of place amid the suffering. * The beauty seems much sadder now, as these soldiers' lives are now over and they will have no other chance to feel the joys of this beauty again.

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Why did the First World War affect the people of Britain in so many ...

    3 star(s)

    Some troops were very loyal to the war effort aswell, because they were very patriotic and wanted to be heroes. Families and children were also affected but differently from other civilians, because war had come into their homes, the war had affected and changed family life.

  2. Determination of the Value of the Gas Constant and the Molar Volume of Oxygen ...

    0.395 J.K-1.mol-1 at 294.5 K and 101300 Pa Using the data collected during this experiment, it is also possible to calculate the volume of one mole of oxygen gas (i.e. to empirically determine the molar volume of an ideal gas at ?

  1. WAR POETRY: Themes in War Poetry

    They had to try and survive through although most did not and many watched as fellow soldiers, their friends died, while they were helpless in stopping the suffering of the horrors that war brought along with the battles. Owen makes the reader feel like they are actually witnessing the events

  2. Regeneration - The Horror of Pity and War

    as it does the near opposite of getting soldiers better but only to get them better to go back out into the war and die. Both writers show their views on the damaging effect of the war by constantly repeating the horrors for example; Barker uses emasculation as a motif.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work