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Imagination; An Endless Vision In the poems "Ode on a Grecian Urn" by Jonathan Keats and "To His Coy Mistress" by Marvell the notion of time is very significant.

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Introduction

Daniel Tavakoli Doctor Gaylord English 101000-25 1/03/2003 Imagination; An Endless Vision In the poems "Ode on a Grecian Urn" by Jonathan Keats and "To His Coy Mistress" by Marvell the notion of time is very significant. In "To His Coy Mistress" Marvell discusses a control over time, and this control over time is for the most part a theoretical and imaginative concept that was conjured by the writer. Marvel is also fascinated by the control over what truly exists. In "Ode on a Grecian Urn" Keats is portraying the control of things that are not subject to time. The writer strongly believes in a control of the imagination. These two poems come to teach the reader that although one should physically "seize the day", one should also use his imagination to unleash the true beauty of things. Although these two poems seem very different, especially in their style of writing they are actually quite similar. Both Keats and Marvel are trying to unleash the true beauty of humanity, but each uses its own approach. Keats approach involves using irony and opposites; contrasting things of action (like time) to things of stillness (like the urn). ...read more.

Middle

In addition to being a believer in control of time, Keats is also a strong believer in the control of the imagination. Many of the images he creates require our imagination to unleash the inner beauty of the urn. He asks many questions that he does not give answers to in order to make the reader think. "What leaf-fring'd legend haunts about thy shape// What men or gods are these? What maidens loth?// What pipes and timbrels? What wild ecstasy?" (5-10). As Keats wrote in his poem "Heard melodies are sweet, but those unheard / Are sweeter; therefore, ye soft pipes, play on; (11-12), and indeed one should use his imagination to do so. "To His Coy Mistress" and "Ode on a Grecian Urn" demonstrate to the reader that although one should physically "seize the day", one should also use his imagination to unleash the true beauty of things. Keats and Marvel convey this fact in the course of their poems. As Keats indited, "Heard melodies are sweet, but those unheard / Are sweeter; therefore, ye soft pipes, play on; / Not to the sensual ear, but, more endear'd," (11-13). Listening to music is wonderful, but the music that one imagines is even more amazing. ...read more.

Conclusion

He goes on to say that "The grave's a fine and private place, / But none I think do there embrace." (31-32). This might seem to be very crude upon a first reading, but Marvels approach is ingenious. He is telling the reader that even if life is to short, it should be enjoyed to the fullest extent possible physically and mentally. In "To His Coy Mistress" Marvell discusses a control over time, which is a theoretical and imaginative concept that was conjured by the writer. In "Ode on a Grecian Urn" Keats discusses the control of things that are not subject to time and a control of the imagination. These two poems show the reader that one should physically "seize the day" and use his imagination to unleash the true beauty of things. Both Keats and Marvel are trying to unleash the true beauty of humanity, but each uses its own approach. Keats uses irony and opposites whereas Marvel is interested in a "carpe diem" outlook on life using the ideal if time had no end and contrasting it to the reality of death. Sources Consulted: Holt, Rinehart, and Kingston. Adventures in English Literature. New York: Harcourt Brace & Company, 1996. 1 Tavakoli ...read more.

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