• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

James's Joyce's 'A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man'.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

In James's Joyce's A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man the portrait is of Stephen Dedalus. He, the protagonist, narrates the novel and through his eyes we see his development from a shy, almost curious boy to a rebellious and independent young man. Stephen seeks a way out of his restraints. In Stephen's case, these are family, country and religion. Joyce uses symbolism as well as language and imagery to show Stephen's development. In a sense, Portrait of the Artist is a search for identity. Chapter One contains several first-times for young Stephen Dedalus: he sits at the adult table, he interacts with peers in a new place (Clongowes), he is punished, he seeks justice, and his peers publicly recognize him. ...read more.

Middle

But there could not be; and it was unjust and cruel and unfair." Stephen finds he must learn to rely on his own inner resources to liberate himself from obstacles. Stephen's happiness in winning the essay contest in Chapter Two and lavishly squandering his money is replaced by shame and embarrassment in trying to, "build a breakwater of order and elegance against the sordid tide of life." Furthermore, Stephen succumbs to sex, surrendering his escape from the filth and poverty of Dublin to his consuming emotions of yearnings of adolescence. Just as Stephen's sexual experience symbolizes his transition from boyhood to manhood, the family's move to Dublin and Stephen's move to Belvedere College symbolize a move away from adolescence and closer to adulthood. ...read more.

Conclusion

As a result, Stephen is required to detach himself from his present environment and become the artist. Finally, in Chapter Five Stephen becomes discouraged and frustrated by others who do not understand him and needs independence desperately. Stephen finds pseudo-freedom while attending the university, however not complete freedom. Stephen's lecture to Lynch about the meaning of beauty, was symbolic of his attempt to rise above his mundane surroundings. Stephen, in search for the aesthetic, is incessantly inundated with those who criticize him for separating himself from his culture. Even Stephen's "priest like" friend, Cranly, advises him to conform to the wishes of his family and fellow students. Stephen leaves Dublin to escape criticism from those who could not grasp the working of his mind. In writing A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, James Joyce succeeded in symbolically depicting Stephen's journey to manhood and independence as entirely internal. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level James Joyce section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level James Joyce essays

  1. A Portrait of the Artist As a Young Man, James Joyce and Myth of ...

    You may not be able to come up with final answers, but you should clarify in your own mind the lure and the dangers of flying, and you should be able to justify human flight. IB AND AP FINAL ESSAY---1000-1500 words, typed, double-spaced.

  2. James Joyce's Alter Ego - In James Joyce's A Portrait of the Artist as ...

    'A Portrait of the Artist'" (Anderson, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man: Text Criticism, and Notes 257). Joyce wanted to let all of the emotions of his life out at this point in his life by telling his story.

  1. A Portrait of Stephen Dedalus as a Young Man

    The name Joyce gave his hero underscores this aspect of his character. His first name comes from St. Stephen, the first Christian martyr; many readers have seen Stephen as a martyr to his art.

  2. Discuss Joyce's treatment of women in Dubliners, Portrait and selected chapters of Ulysses.

    This active choice empowers the men within the text. Their ability to disregard women as they choose is an important part of the power structure created and signals to the reader Stephen's sanction of this structure. Similarly, they are the objects of worship that are also represented for the use of men.

  1. Comparing and Contrast James Joyce

    this passage was, 'She set he white face to him, passive like a helpless animal.' This is portraying that she is scared and confused.Eveline obviously didn't want to escape because she would be betraying her mother and her father so she leaves Frank alone and goes back home.

  2. James Joyce: An Exhaustion at the

    Holy shidders. Joyce's hand had it going. Effectively exceptional. Exceptionally well. All the power to him. Just tryin' to impress the chicks. That orbit traces. Multiple circles of beauty. Exotic erotica. The circles clutch. The circles mock. The circles squeeze. The circles juice. The circles mop. Amen. Psychologists brand it as the flux of discovering a sexual identity.

  1. Struggle for Freedom

    Similarly, the themes in both short stories illustrate flight in one case and freedom in another, during their adolescence years of the characters. This shows how the characters move on to live their life in Flight or the transition from boys to men (bigger boys)

  2. DUBLINERS - What picture do you think that Joyce gives of growing up in ...

    It seems like he is rejecting his education by embarking on this adventure and we are never told that he retrieves the books from the grass; a sign that he may have given it up for good. We can also see much detail concerning Dublin in the story and this

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work