• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Poetry is known to stimulate powerful responses in readers. Examine your reactions to these poems. How do they make you feel and why? Analyse the link between the various techniques used by the poets and your personal response.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

GCSE Literature Coursework-Poetry Poetry is known to stimulate powerful responses in readers. Examine your reactions to these poems. How do they make you feel and why? Analyse the link between the various techniques used by the poets and your personal response. Use detailed references to the poems to support your comments. Reactions: #1Reader feels disturbed; unsettled, because (No more Hiroshimas) d and u poet speaks about relics of the attack that remind us people were the victims of these attacks, not just buildings or far-off governments or high-flown principles (The Day After) d and u reader does not know who is right and who is wrong-what should the Americans have done rather than cause so much suffering? Was there another way to end the war? Could the countries have worked something out? (Monuments of Hiroshima) u only was a 'wooden box' too much to ask for? We should give the victims of the attacks some more substantial monuments, something that respects their courage or at least their individuality-makes reader think (Ghosts, Fire, Water) d and u the reader almost feels scared, frightened of the ghosts, who are reaching out their hands and blaming us, and he/she wants to run away, or find some excuse for the bombings, but cannot... reader also wants to deny that he/she ever stopped "loving others", but cannot... These poems make the reader feel unsettled. ...read more.

Middle

the poet transports the reader back to right after the bomb fell with vivid descriptions and imagery-the reader wonders where the "...bits of burnt clothing..." came from, and the "twisted buttons..." and "The white blouse polka-dotted with atomic rain, indelible...' but especially the "...cotton summer pants the blasted boys crawled home in to bleed, and slowly die."(The day after) frightened the poet has a very severe verdict for man-extinction-the reader wants to deny this verdict, justify the Americans, protest his/her innocence... The reader feels frightened of the ghosts in "Ghosts, Fire, Water", because they blame the reader for what happened ("Their voices call out to us, in pain and indignation: 'This is what you have done to us!"). The reader wants to run away, or find some excuse for the bombings, but cannot... James Kirkup uses strong, repetitive language to emphasize how much pain the ghosts suffered, and this makes the reader feel even guiltier. The reader also wants to deny that he/she ever stopped "loving others", but cannot...for the poet himself seems to believe that the reader, perhaps the world, is responsible for the ghosts of Hiroshima, for he writes: "Forgive us..." and "Their shame is ours". "Ghosts, Fire, Water also makes the reader feel uncomfortable because it is talking about something abstract, unreal, almost frightening-ghosts-and this in itself makes the reader feel frightened. James Kirkup's "No More Hiroshimas" and "Ghosts, Fire, Water", Edward Lowbury's "The Day After" and D.J. ...read more.

Conclusion

Words like "...doom...agony...torn...mutilated...blind...helpless..." bring to mind glaringly realistic images of tortured, anguished people. These remind the reader how fortunate he/she is, to be alive and free from intense suffering. Enright uses balanced rhythm and rhyme to portray the dead people of Hiroshima: "Little of peace for them to rest in, less of them to rest in peace: //Dust to dust a swift transition, ashes to ash with awful ease." The poem 'flows' off the tongue smoothly and reflects the ease with which the people were killed. This encourages the reader to consider the sanctity of life and how much people are worth. Do we deserve to enjoy life when so many never will? These are war poems, and they are sombre and perhaps somewhat disheartening. They are also very important and meaningful, for they remind people of a time when countless numbers were hurt and killed. The poets use emotive language and moving descriptions to shock, scare and sadden the reader. More importantly, the poets encourage the reader to feel determined the world will never kill so many again. I think this was the poets' intention. They wanted to show everyone how much unhappiness stemmed from war. They wanted to warn the world never to go to war again. They wanted the world to remember Hiroshima and how much she suffered, for if we remember we will never repeat the mistake. They write in the hope that we will always remember. Let us do so. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level War Poetry section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level War Poetry essays

  1. World War 1 Poetry Coursework

    In this poem he clearly shows his willingness and his passion for war and country. Throughout this poem Grenfell makes strong comparisons to war and the wilderness. This shows that he thought war was natural. Jessie Pope's technique strongly contrasts Grenfell's.

  2. Iscuss and analyse "No more Hiroshima's" by James Kirkup and "If this is a ...

    He the poet hasn't lived through the event. He understands that people have suffered enough without having continual daily reminders. Kirkup first describes the weather as "winters afternoon's wet snow". This gives the image of a cold, wet dreary afternoon.

  1. Stimulus and Response analysis: Dramatic and Literary depictions of war

    I enjoyed learning about the different views of war. This is because I feel that by exploring all the alternative views of a matter help you to gain a better understanding and thus can improve a person's ability to do something.

  2. "The First World War poets were able to affect the emotions of their readers. ...

    stanza, as the men 'Know their feet have come to the end of the world'. This dramatic way of phrasing the soldier's situation is an effective use of language as the end of the world is the most desperate situation and maybe this is how the soldiers are feeling.

  1. First World War poets were able to affect the emotions of their readers. Choose ...

    Opposing this Suicide in the trenches is about the suicide of a simple soldier boy. The title immediately affects the reader's emotion and provides the subject matter. God! How I hate you has a similar subject matter, it is about how his hatred of Hugh Freston, (hence the title)

  2. World War 1 Poetry.

    and is particularly effective as it shows a strong link between nature and soldiers. Then Grenfell shows the qualities a bird of prey has and compares them to the skills of a soldier. 'The kestrel hovering by day, And the little owls that call by night, Bid him be swift

  1. Write about the Variety of responses to war that you have found amongst the ...

    The use of alliteration captures the urgency with which he feels. This 'first foe' is described as his 'new mistress'. She is described as being the new object of his devotion, which he 'chases', he is so eager to posses 'her' obsesses him.

  2. Examine a selection of poetry by the war poets. What do you learn of ...

    The subject of Tennyson's poem was the ill-fated "Charge of the Light Brigade" which occurred during the Crimean War (1854-56). The war was fought between the Allies (Britain and France) and Russia because Russia attempted to take land from the recently deceased Turkish Empire.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work