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Show how Brooke in 'Peace' organizes his ideas and uses language to persuade his reader that the announcement of war is a thing to be celebrated.

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Introduction

Show how Brooke in 'Peace' organizes his ideas and uses language to persuade his reader that the announcement of war is a thing to be celebrated. Rupert Brooke's Peace echoes the feelings felt by most people as the war began, his poem seems to be a celebration of war and encourages others to join the war effort. Many images are used in the first four lines including religious calling, inspired youth, waking with restored strength, and the swimmer turning (away from filthiness) and diving into sparkling clean water are images of baptism. He starts the poem in a prayer-like tone "Now, God be thanked who has matched us with his hour". ...read more.

Middle

"To turn, as swimmers into cleanness leaping, Glad from a world grown old and cold and weary," Brooke describes war as a new and exciting adventure, a chance to cleanse them almost creating a new life for themselves. He describes war in a positive light, showing it as an opportunity for a better life away from the 'weary' country they are presently used to. "Leave the sick hearts that honour could not move, and half-men, and their dirty songs and dreary, and all the emptiness of love!" Brookes is very negative about peacetime, which is a sharp contrast to his description of his celebration for war "now, God be thanked". ...read more.

Conclusion

"There" is both the war and Brooke's own state simplicity of what he sees is a soldier's life and fate whether a soldier in war or a soldier of life. Rupert Brooke is very persuasive and encourages others to participate in war. "And the worst friend and enemy is but Death", he believes that death is not even very important in comparison to fighting for ones country. Brooke was a pre- war poet, expressing the pre-war sentiment of cleansing and wrote poetry in the early days of the war that celebrated this image of the "Happy Warrior." In the early days of the war Brookes would have been able to persuade many people with this poem that war should in fact be celebrated as death was honourable and that was the 'worst friend' they would experience. ...read more.

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