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The History of the English Bible.

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Introduction

The History of the English Bible One of the most read books of all time, the Bible has gone through many stages. Written first in Greek and Hebrew, it is now offered in almost every language found on Earth. All the original manuscripts of the Bible were hand written. There are many translations of the Bible into languages other than English dating back to 285 BC. Starting with the Septuagint Version and ending with the most recent publication of the English Standard Version, the Bible has had an incredible journey. The history of the Bible can be put into three groups: ancient versions, early English versions, and new English versions (Origin, 1). Translations of the Bible occurred because the people wanted a copy of the Bible in their common tongue. The Septuagint version of the Bible is probably one of the oldest translations. Done under the request of Alexander the Great, it took 150 years to complete the Septuagint (Preparing, 1). The Septuagint was a translation of the Old Testament from Hebrew into English. After this translation, a few lesser known translations were made. The first of these next translations was the Samaritan Pentateuch. The exact date for this translation is not known, but it is believed to be after the Septuagint. The Samaritan Pentateuch was a copy of the Hebrew text done in Samaritan characters (Origin, 1). Following the Samaritan Pentateuch was the Peshito, or Syriac, which was a Bible translation used in parts of Syria. ...read more.

Middle

Following Tyndale's translation, a man named Miles Coverdale printed the first complete Bible in English (Language, 4). Since Coverdale did not know Hebrew or Greek, he relied on the Vulgate and Martin Luther's German translation while he made his own version of the English Bible. He also made some revisions to Tyndale's translation. "God in time past diversely and many ways spake unto the fathers the prophets, but in these last days he has spoken unto us by his Son, whom he hath made heir of all things, by whom also he made the world (McAfee, 4). Coverdale's translation is responsible for the literary quality of the English Bible. The second complete English Bible to be printed was done so by John Rogers, under the name Thomas Matthew. His Bible, known as Matthew's Bible, was written using the works of Tyndale and Coverdale. The next major accomplishment in the Bible's history was the publication of the Great Bible. The Great Bible, which was based on the Tyndale, Coverdale, and Matthews Bibles, was commissioned by Thomas Cramer, the Archbishop of Canterbury (History1, 2). "God in time past diversely and many ways spake unto the fathers by prophets, but in these last days he hath spoken unto us by his own Son, whom he hath made heir of all things, by whom also he made the world" (McAfee, 5). The first few editions of the Bible that were offered in English were illegal. ...read more.

Conclusion

last days he has spoken to us by a Son, whom he appointed the heir of all things, through whom also he created the world" (Hebrews, 6). The Revised Standard Version is used in most Protestant churches today. After these last few versions, many followed. In 1973, the popular New International Version was published. Hebrews 1 reads "1 In the past God spoke to our forefathers through the prophets at many times and in various ways, 2 but in these last days he has spoken to us by his Son, whom he appointed heir of all things, and through whom he made the universe" (Hebrews, 8). After this came the New King James Version, the New Revised Standard Version, and the New Living Translation. The most recent version of the English Bible is the English Standard Version, published in 2001 (Hebrews, 10). The Bible's written history dates back before 285 BC. Taken from its original texts of Hebrew and Greek, the Bible has undergone many revisions. In its Greek translation,"1???????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????" is what Hebrews 1 looks like (Hebrews, 1). In its most modern version, Hebrews 1 is read as "1 Long ago, at many times and in many ways, God spoke to our fathers by the prophets, 2 but in these last days he has spoken to us by his Son, whom he appointed the heir of all things, through whom also he created the world" (Hebrews, 10). Changing from Greek and Hebrew into Latin, English, and countless other languages, the Bible remains one of the most read books in the world. ...read more.

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