• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The Perseption of Parent - Child Relationships In the Sonnets By George Eliot and Sir Walter Ralegh.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

THE PERSEPTION OF PARENT/CHILD RELATIONSHIPS IN THE SONNETS BY GEORGE ELIOT AND SIR WALTER RALEGH. 'Brother and Sister' by George Eliot and 'Sir Walter Ralegh to his son' by Sir Walter Ralegh are both sonnets on the subject of Children and Parental Relationships. Despite one sonnet being written by a woman and the other by a man, their relationships with their children are very important to them. They are both Shakespearean sonnets, dealing with the aspects of age and experience. George Eliot is writing as a child and what their mother is saying to them, where as Sir Ralegh is writing as a father and what he is saying to his son. It is distinguished that George is writing as a child as her first line says her mother "stroked down my tippet and set my brother's frill " Therefore, this will have to be taken into account when comparing the two sonnets. Both sonnets are similar, as life is being explained - what must and mustn't be done and what to look out for. ...read more.

Middle

He is warning his son that meeting them can ruin a person's life. He is talking from past experience and is warning his son of the dangers. There seems to be no hidden meaning(s) in George Eliot's sonnet, apart from the thought that she may be talking about her innocent childhood, or how she would have liked it to be. There is a rhyme scheme in both sonnets. The last word in every other line rhymes. In 'Brother and Sister': 'ways, gaze' 'elms, realms' 'shade, braid'. In 'Sir Walter Ralegh to his son' : 'far, mar' 'tree, thee' 'not, rot' 'wild, child'. In this sonnet, the last word in each sentence for the cuplet rhyme (pray, day) - where as they do not in George Eliot's sonnet (solemnity, me). George Eliot describes her surrounding nature as something that plays a very important role in her childhood. In contrast to this, the 'wood', the 'weed' and the 'wag' are all part of nature and yet this is the problem, when they all meet. Whilst George Eliot's sonnet discusses the issue of a mother talking to her children, whilst playing and gazing at them, Sir Ralegh's sonnet just talks about the situation - there is no side-track. ...read more.

Conclusion

But in contrast, even if only read for the first time, George Eliot's sonnet is taken seriously and less light-heartedly. Also, the relationship between mother and child in "Brother and Sister" seems more relaxed where as the other poet seems to want to get the talk over and done with - a less easy relationship. The final cuplets in both the sonnets have different meanings. George Eliot describes her overall feelings about nature and what her mother had said to her. "And made a happy strange solemnity, A deep-toned chant from life unknown to me" But, Sir Ralegh's ending cuplet is more formal - a prayer and wish is being made for the safety of the son against the three things. "Then bless thee, and beware, and let us pray, We part not with thee at this meeting day". Both sonnets show that the best is wanted for the child/children from the parent, although both poets describe it in many different ways. When I first read the sonnets, I didn't feel that there was any real meaning to either George Elliot or Sir Walter Ralegh's sonnet. But, on closer examination I have found that is not the case. Both sonnets refer well to the heading of "Parent/ Child Relationships". 3 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Sonnets section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Sonnets essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    A critical appreciation of 'to my mother' by George Baker.

    4 star(s)

    not only her large size, but also of her habits, sense of humour, lively, enquiring mind, compassion, loud, exuberant love of life, courage and faith. In the octave of the sonnet, he accumulates vivid impressions of all these characteristics except for the most important ones, her courage and faith, which

  2. 'To my mother' by George Baker

    His exuberant exclamation near the end of the poem, 'and so I send O all my faith and all my love to her...'confirms the strength of these feelings. The warm, humorous, delightfully frank way Baker describes his 'irresistible' mother in the intervening lines also convinces us of his strong attachment to her.

  1. Are there any ways in which you consider that experiences conveyed by the sonnets, ...

    Thou art more lovely and more temperate.' Shakespeare decides that the person is lovelier than a summer's day, and explains that the person does not change rapidly, this could be a reflection of the individual's personality; they are tolerant, and fair.

  2. Explore aspects of the sonnet tradition through reference to a range of material you ...

    Her reputation rests chiefly on the love poems written during their courtship. Her sonnets were mostly dedicated to her husband Robert and portray the way she felt about him. In the sonnet "How do I love thee?" this is shown.

  1. Consider the sonnet as a verse form. With examples compare the Petrarchan and ...

    "On His Blindness" is an autobiographical account of Milton's struggle to cope with his blindness, and the octave seems to ask the underlying question, 'Why me?' In the first six lines, there is an allusion to the parable of talents in the Bible, as we see where it says, "And

  2. Compare the ways in which the poets express strength of feeling in "Spring" and ...

    Also, the repetition of the vowel sound in the citation highlights the feeling of the noise that the poet could hear. The words are precise, and bold, just as we are told the song is. As the poet depicts how the trees are blossoming, the metaphor: "glassy peartree", in two

  1. An examination of the sonnet from Petrarch to Browning.

    "She lives in fickle hopes and dreams untrue." He is also speaking about how any other woman would have hopes and dreams about capturing his heart because it is bound to Laura. In the seventh line of the octave, Petrarch has mentioned about how the persona has things in common with his lover Laura.

  2. Compare ‘Shall Icompare thee to a summer’s day?’ by W. Shakespeare, ‘How do I ...

    Shakespeare uses a great deal of elaborate imagery and with the reversal of meaning seems to play amusing games with the reader. Shakespeare starts his sonnet with a rhetorical question; "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?" and then goes on to say; "Thou art more lovely and more

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work