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Why Was There A Stalemate? Due to a change in the nature of warfare, it had become easier to defend than attack for a number of reasons:

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Introduction

Why Was There A Stalemate? Due to a change in the nature of warfare, it had become easier to defend than attack for a number of reasons: * New high powered weapons had been introduced, and they had a big impact. Now, it was possible for a sustained bombardment on one particular target from a long distance away. These machine guns could gun down masses of people rapidly and accurately, since there was no recoil. Anyone attempting to cross No Man Land would be likely to be the victim of these guns, making progress extremely difficult. * This war was nothing like the Wars of Mobility of old, and they had been replaced by a War of Attrition. The war could not be won in a single battle, and as both side's populations were evenly matched, the result was a stalemate. ...read more.

Middle

* Trenches could be supplied by railway meaning that men and other supplies could be constantly taken to the trenches as the men were either killed or injured and the supplies exhausted. * The size of the armies increased massively throughout the war, with the British army itself increasing from 100,00 men to 5 million! This made it even harder for progress to be made, as it would mean wearing down massive numbers. Conscription contributed heavily to this increased number, but the casualty rate was a massive 90%. * Armies had become too big and dispersed to be led properly from the front. Generals now commanded their men many miles away from the front line. This becomes possible by the invention of the telephone, allowing instructions to be sent via this invention. ...read more.

Conclusion

* A discovery from a French sweet maker meant that armies could be kept in the field all year round, instead of having to retreat during winter. He discovered that by storing food in an air-tight container and then heating it, the food could be preserved for years without being affected by bacteria. This meant that there were unlimited food supplies for the armies, and now both sides were able to sustain large armies in the field all year round, keeping both sides in close contact the whole time. The trenches meant that the food jars could be then stored there for up to four years. The great Napoleon once said that "armies march on their stomachs." * The Generals must accept some responsibility for the stalemate. Despite being experienced leaders, they were not used to the new type of war, and they were not used to the new technology on show. Old and traditional tactics such as cavalry charges failed, and this led to a stalemate. ...read more.

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