• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Write a critical appreciation of the following passage, suggesting how far its styles and concerns are characteristic of the novel as a whole.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Write a critical appreciation of the following passage, suggesting how far its styles and concerns are characteristic of the novel as a whole. In this passage, Jane Austen's style mostly contains a combination of language, with the third person and past tense, associated with the narrator's perspective, irony and tone. Her style is direct and subtle, while noticeably dropping hints of what is truly happening, throughout the novel. Her style also reveals concerns such as mystery, suspicion and humour. The passage opens with a very descriptive paragraph, which sets the scene. It is subtle and to the point, creating an instant emotion, while unobtrusively setting up objects of satire. For example when referring to Emma's always doing what she liked. This is typical of Jane Austen's style; she is simple and direct, and similarly sets up the character of Emma at the beginning of the novel. This also creates an immediate effect; that Emma is arrogant and almost too perfect, with everything one could wish for. Another aspect of Jane Austen's style is to allow the reader intimate access to a character's thoughts, "Emma could not but pity such feelings, whatever their origin..." ...read more.

Middle

how 'in the dark' Emma is about Jane's situation and her and Frank's true connection.The reader consequently shares Emma's path to self-discovery; in the first reading of the book, the true relationship between Frank and Jane is not known at the timing of this passage, and revalations become apparent to us at the same time as they do to Emma. But, at the same time, I felt that I could see things much more clearly than Emma did, as I was not misguided by romantic fantasies, but saw the novel through a real light, and found it ironic that Frank was always visiting the Bates. This is also another of Austen's techniques - to allow the reader to have their own opinion of what is happening in the story, despite the point of view of the dominant character, Emma. While her opinions are made clear, the reader's own opinions also develop. The irony of this passage begins with "the young man was yet able to shew a most happy countenance on seeing Emma again." ...read more.

Conclusion

Part of the author's style is to voice her own opinions, but not to impact on the overall feelings of Emma. The use of direct and indirect conversation diverges according to how much the reader needs to be involved in the immediate material. There is little dialogue in this passage, and it is indirect, which puts more distance between the reader and the material, allowing own opinions and suspicions to arise, and at times a better satirical view. In conclusion, this passage uses a range of techniques, such as irony, subtle tone which does not distract from the views and thoughts of the main character, laying out a direct description to set a scene, and directly accessing the dominant character's thoughts. These things are all needed not only for the reader to make their own views and suspicions in the course of the novel, but delving into Emma's true thoughts also allow the reader to understand her fully, and understand and accept her behaviour. Style techniques such as irony also set up concerns such as mystery and suspicion. Elysse Jones 13cl ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Jane Austen section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Jane Austen essays

  1. How does Jane Austen present the themes of love and marriage in the novel ...

    Both Jane and Frank did behave rudely. Since all turned out well for the two of them, they hurt nobody during their dishonesty. Jane and Frank are to be married soon. At this point Emma stands outside the social communications of her friends. Among her social circle in Highbury, she is alone.

  2. Discuss the function of setting in the presentation of Jane Austen's main concerns in ...

    However for Emma, a member of higher class this was different, as it is shown, she was educated by Miss Taylor as would all member s of upper class be tutored at home. Through out the novel there are marriage agreements and suitors made and discussions between characters of "equal

  1. The various portrayals of heroines in Jane Austen's novels as well as investigate, who ...

    When later Catherine runs to the Tilney's to apologise her motives are entirely right, spontaneous, innocent and heroic. The novel Sense and Sensibility can be read as a satire on the eighteenth heroine of sensibility. The novel deals with the two opposing qualities of sensibility and sense.

  2. An exploration of Jane Austen's use of the outdoors in Emma

    Knightley's wishes above her own is illustrated by her decision to stay outside, where they may "speak openly". Had she returned inside Mr Knightley, mortified by her apparent disinterest, would probably never have disturbed her with unwanted attentions again, and Emma's happiness might have been ruined.

  1. Jane Austen said of Emma 'she is a character who no-one but myself will ...

    Knightly comes across as not. Mr. Knightly is virtually never wrong, as he shows clarity and insight in judging Emma as well as other characters. To us as a reader we feel we can trust and respect him for his thoughts and opinions.

  2. Discuss the significance of this passage in your reading of the novel

    However, this deems to be unsuccessful and in the end she yields to her own attempt at persuasion and claims that eight years is in fact "little more than nothing". Another effect that contributes to the anxiety from Anne is the use of short sentences, for example "She had seen him.

  1. What is the dramatic significance of Act 2 to the play as a whole? ...

    But the officials suggest that she is not speaking from her "natural memory" and it is not necessarily the truth. Hale says "that someone conjures you even now to say this." They do not believe her in any case. Elizabeth's realisation that Abigail is set on destroying her causes her to cry out "The girl is a murderer!

  2. Madame Bovary and Techniques in Fiction

    (MB, 2) To make the scene seem more interesting Flaubert would transition very well from writing without any literary devices to adding metaphors without a notice. This did not make the novel seem award at all but make it flow through very nicely.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work