• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Write a critical appreciation of the following passage, suggesting how far its styles and concerns are characteristic of the novel as a whole.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Write a critical appreciation of the following passage, suggesting how far its styles and concerns are characteristic of the novel as a whole. In this passage, Jane Austen's style mostly contains a combination of language, with the third person and past tense, associated with the narrator's perspective, irony and tone. Her style is direct and subtle, while noticeably dropping hints of what is truly happening, throughout the novel. Her style also reveals concerns such as mystery, suspicion and humour. The passage opens with a very descriptive paragraph, which sets the scene. It is subtle and to the point, creating an instant emotion, while unobtrusively setting up objects of satire. For example when referring to Emma's always doing what she liked. This is typical of Jane Austen's style; she is simple and direct, and similarly sets up the character of Emma at the beginning of the novel. This also creates an immediate effect; that Emma is arrogant and almost too perfect, with everything one could wish for. Another aspect of Jane Austen's style is to allow the reader intimate access to a character's thoughts, "Emma could not but pity such feelings, whatever their origin..." ...read more.

Middle

how 'in the dark' Emma is about Jane's situation and her and Frank's true connection.The reader consequently shares Emma's path to self-discovery; in the first reading of the book, the true relationship between Frank and Jane is not known at the timing of this passage, and revalations become apparent to us at the same time as they do to Emma. But, at the same time, I felt that I could see things much more clearly than Emma did, as I was not misguided by romantic fantasies, but saw the novel through a real light, and found it ironic that Frank was always visiting the Bates. This is also another of Austen's techniques - to allow the reader to have their own opinion of what is happening in the story, despite the point of view of the dominant character, Emma. While her opinions are made clear, the reader's own opinions also develop. The irony of this passage begins with "the young man was yet able to shew a most happy countenance on seeing Emma again." ...read more.

Conclusion

Part of the author's style is to voice her own opinions, but not to impact on the overall feelings of Emma. The use of direct and indirect conversation diverges according to how much the reader needs to be involved in the immediate material. There is little dialogue in this passage, and it is indirect, which puts more distance between the reader and the material, allowing own opinions and suspicions to arise, and at times a better satirical view. In conclusion, this passage uses a range of techniques, such as irony, subtle tone which does not distract from the views and thoughts of the main character, laying out a direct description to set a scene, and directly accessing the dominant character's thoughts. These things are all needed not only for the reader to make their own views and suspicions in the course of the novel, but delving into Emma's true thoughts also allow the reader to understand her fully, and understand and accept her behaviour. Style techniques such as irony also set up concerns such as mystery and suspicion. Elysse Jones 13cl ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Jane Austen section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Jane Austen essays

  1. How does Jane Austen present the themes of love and marriage in the novel ...

    point that the two must certainly be in love with one another. Both suffered a great deal of pain during their secret engagement and risked their reputation among society by deceiving their friends and family. Both Jane and Frank did behave rudely.

  2. An exploration of Jane Austen's use of the outdoors in Emma

    The romance is sprung on the reader so quickly that there is no time to connect with the couple emotionally. This last part of the book sees Emma at her most becoming, modestly fearing rejection when she realises her feelings for Mr Knightley, and almost sacrificing her own happiness for

  1. Jane Austen said of Emma 'she is a character who no-one but myself will ...

    Austen is demonstrating irony. The irony in Emma's belief that she is the centre of everyone's intrigues when she is in fact blind to her own feelings she has of Mr. knightly. I think as a reader I would say I much rather prefer Emma's character when she is in the presence of Mr.

  2. The various portrayals of heroines in Jane Austen's novels as well as investigate, who ...

    'she had a thin awkward figure, a sallow skin without colour' (15). In sketching Catherine's background, appearance and disposition her author manages to suggest both typical gothic heroine qualities, and in Catherine herself, the inverse. Throughout the early part of Northanger Abbey Jane Austen is careful to point out that

  1. Madame Bovary and Techniques in Fiction

    Each scene shows what is happening and is not leaving anything out like behavior, attitude, ect. Each scene coincides with each other; it does not seem out of place compared to the other. Flaubert also does not have the narrator state something and the character does it, but he lets the readers find out eventually.

  2. Discuss the function of setting in the presentation of Jane Austen's main concerns in ...

    a real, honest, old-fashioned boarding school...where girls may be sent out the way and scramble themselves in to a little education, without any danger of bringing back prodigies" We are shown the kind of education girls would have received at the time, a middle class education.

  1. What is the dramatic significance of Act 2 to the play as a whole? ...

    a large amount of courage as well; to keep on fighting for her relationship to keep going and trying her best. At the end of the act when Elizabeth gets arrested we sympathise with her as we know she is a good person and does not deserve to be arrested.

  2. A Passage To India - Write an account of the trip to the Marabar ...

    After Miss Quested and Mrs Moore arrive at the station we are then quickly involved in the action of what these chapters are going to enlighten us with. As Fielding and Professor Godbole arrive late and the train begins to leave "He's not to he'll kill himself".

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work