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Mauritius - Case Study Focusing On Population.

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Introduction

Mauritius - Case Study Focusing On Population Mauritius is a small island in the Indian Ocean just off the east coast of Africa. The island was discovered by the Portuguese in 1505 and subsequently colonised by a number of European countries (Britain, France & Holland) before gaining independence in 1968. The European colonies started what is the major economy in Mauritius today - sugar. After the abolition of slavery in Britain (when the island was under British rule) workers were brought from India, which created a wealth of ethnic groups. At the beginning of the 20th century the growth of population in Mauritius was relatively slow. ...read more.

Middle

The Mauritian government was facing many obstacles in trying to achieve optimum population. How Has Mauritius Managed To Control Its Population? Thirty years ago the Island of Mauritius had an incredibly high birth rate of almost 3% per year, or a fertility rate of 6.2 children per woman. The population density was more than 300 people per Km2, and there was poor healthcare and many diseases. Today there has been an economic revival and the fertility rate has dropped to only 3.2 children per woman in the last 10 years (from 6.2). The amazing drop in fertility was not actually due to any particular policy or measure and seemed to happen almost voluntarily. ...read more.

Conclusion

Women also have a much more strengthened position in society. Women are now a much larger part of the workforce and increasingly women are beginning to put work ahead of raising a family. Today the population is continuing to increase but at a much steadier rate - a mere 0.84% compared to 3% 30 years ago. Also the fertility rate has dropped to an acceptable level - now only 1.98 compared to 6.2 30 years ago. In short Mauritius has solved its population crisis and has almost achieved optimum population It is a good example of how the promotion of women's status in society can solve excessive population growth. ...read more.

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Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

4 star(s)

A very good review describing the changes in population along with some explanations for the reasons why. Good use of relevant statistics. There are some areas where more detail and linkages are needed to give a more comprehensive understanding, eg. extended and linked explanations: 'and so... therefore... because'. The use of linked data would also be relevant here eg. % females in education as well as just stats specifically on population growth.

Marked by teacher Katie Price 05/04/2013

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