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Heroin Report What is heroin? Heroin, commonly known as junk or skag, is a drug that is derived from the opium poppy.

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Introduction

Heroin Report What is heroin? Heroin, commonly known as junk or skag, is a drug that is derived from the opium poppy. The poppy is produced mainly in Afghanistan, Burma, Laos and Cambodia in an area known as "The Golden Triangle." Heroin may come in a brown-black form that resembles toffee. It can be smoked, sniffed or injected. Many users have said that the strongest "high" comes from injecting. Heroin comes as a white powder when it's pure (diamorphine), such as that occasionally used by doctors legally as a strong painkiller. Owing to the range of substances it's cut with, street heroin can be anything from brownish white to brown. Why do people take heroin? As with any drug, people may take heroin because of social problems, excitement, rebellion or inaccurate information about the effects and the problems created by the drug. Some may feel they will fit in, or that all of their worries will disappear. ...read more.

Middle

Large quantities of the drug cost more, meaning the user has to steal to feed their addiction. Female addicts may even be driven to solicitation to pay for the drug - a clear sign of the many problems to society caused by heroin addiction. There becomes a psychological and physiological need for heroin. People begin to crave the drug four to six hours after their last injection. Heroin addiction may bring about a number of physical problems. These include collapsing of veins - resulting in the user injecting into the leg or stomach - and liver disease as it is unable to cope with large amounts of a dangerous substance such as heroin. Withdrawal symptoms also occur. Withdrawal from heroin When a heroin user is withdrawing from heroin use, they suffer from a number of protracted symptoms, usually lasting between one and ten weeks. Within about eight to ten hours after their last 'hit', the user's eyes begin to water, they yawn, and they feel anxious and irritable. ...read more.

Conclusion

Chances of getting hooked Heroin is highly addictive. Over time, effects of heroin on the brain cause 'craving' and a strong psychological desire to keep on using. Also, tolerance builds, and the desired effects reduce so much that users have to take more just to get the same effects and even more just to feel 'normal' or to avoid a very unpleasant withdrawal state. Drugs have been developed to help treat heroin addiction. These include opiate substitutes for heroin such as methadone and subutex, and also drugs like naltrexone that block the effects of heroin so you can't get a high once you have become drug-free. Methadone is a heroin replacement available for prescription from a normal pharmacy. Studies have shown that the effectiveness of these drugs depends on the person, and the level of addiction. Studies have shown that heroin addiction is reaching people as young as ten years old. Heroin use and addiction fell during the 1980's and 1990's, but has seen a dramatic rise over the last decade. ...read more.

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