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Principles underpinning work of practitioner in early years. Legislation and reflective practise.

Extracts from this essay...

Introduction

[THE PRINCIPLES UNDERPINNING THE ROLE OF THE PRACTITIONER WORKING WITH CHILDREN. UNIT 5 E1- Describe the responsibility of the practitioner in professional relationships The skills required by a practitioner need to be practised with regard to certain responsibilities: One of the main objectives when working as an early years' practitioner is to work as part of a team to provide high quality care and education for children in accordance with government regulations for example The Statutory Framework for the Early Years Foundation Stage and in line with the setting's principles, policies and procedures. "Policies in early years' settings are there to guide the actions which practitioners need to take to fulfil the vision and aims of the setting and to act as a point of reference against which decisions can be made." Early Years Update To promote and encourage the children's safety and security it would be effective if a practitioner works in line and maintains high levels of safety by abiding with the settings policies and procedures and be aware of any emergency procedures and remain vigilant on the settings premises and to report any issues if necessary to the manager. When dealing with parents, professionals and children, practitioners need effective and positive communication. They need to be able to communicate and listen carefully to maintain partnerships with parents as this will encourage active involvement and respect the crucial part played by parents in the child's learning process. It will enable all parties to build on and share their knowledge and understanding of the child's learning. For example a parent or professional may be critical of the environment or activities and by listening and acknowledging their view the issue can be resolved. They may also make positive suggestions about an issue. "If you value and respect yourself, you will do the same to others. Professional relationships focus on respecting and valuing the strengths, skills and knowledge of people you work with and recognizing the contribution made by everyone in your setting.

Middle

6) Confidentiality Policies in the setting relating to confidentiality must be adhered to. Information relating to a child and/or its parents must not be disclosed unless it is in the interests of child protection. In the latter circumstances any disclosure should only be to other professionals about working colleagues is not disclosed without permission. 7) Keeping children safe It is the responsibility of every practitioner to ensure that the setting is safe for the children and fellow workers. Daily work practices should ensure the prevention of accidents and the protection of health. Familiarity with emergency procedures and the recording of accidents must be adhered to. It is also part of the role of the practitioner to protect children from abuse. 8) Celebrating diversity The UK is a pluralistic society and it is important that cultural diversity is appreciated and viewed positively; no one culture should be viewed as superior. Children should be helped to develop a sense of their own identity within their race or culture group. Children should be introduced to other cultures in a positive way and encouraged to sample food, art, stories and music from different cultures. 9) Working with other professionals Reflecting their own practice is an important part of the role of practitioners. Practitioners should confer with colleagues and other professionals' from outside the setting for support and advice. Respect for other professionals' opinions should be maintained and confidentiality observed at all times. 10) Reflective practitioner Reflecting on their own practice is an important part of the role of practitioners. This reflection should result in extension of their practice. Continuing professional development would be part of this extension as would be advice and support sought from colleagues or other professionals E6- Explain the importance of valuing children's interests and experience. To be "heard" refers to the child's right to speak, participate and decide. The child has a right to be "heard" during all types of activity.

Conclusion

Contemporary Childcare Act (2006) The Stationery Office, Norwich. Choice For Parents, The Best Start for Children: a ten year strategy for childcare (2004) HM Treasury, London. Department for Children, Schools and Families (1997-2004), Effective Provision for the Pre School Education Department for Children, Schools and Families (2007), Early Years Foundation Stage Profile Handbook Department for Children, Schools and Families (2008), Early Years Foundation Stage Handbook Department of Health (1999) Modernising Health and Social Services: national priorities guidance,DoH, London. Department of Health (2004) National Service Framework, DoH, London. Derman Sparks, L. (1989) Anti-bias curriculum: Tools for empowering Young Children, Washington DC: NAEYC DfES (2002) Delivering for Children and Families, The Inter-Departmental Childcare Review, Strategy DfES (2003) Children's Centres - Developing Integrated Services for Young Children and their Families: Start-up guidance, SureStart Communications, London; available online from the Publications page of the Surestart website: http://www.surestart.gov.uk/publications (search for: "developing integrated services").Issues in the Early Years, Sage Publications, London. Gaine B and Van Keulen, A. (1997) Anti-Bias Training Approaches in the Early Years: A Guide for Trainers, Utrecht/ London: Agency MUTANT/ EYTARN Hodgkinson, C. (1991) Educational Leadership : The Moral Art, Albany, NY : State University of New York Press (Cited in Rodd 1994) Lord Laming (2002) The Victoria Climbié Inquiry: report of an inquiry by Lord Laming, HMSO, Norwich available online from: http://www.victoria-climbie-inquiry.org.uk/finreport/finreport.htm. MacNaughton, G. (1999) cited in Siraj Blatchford and Clarke 2000: p-80 Megarry, B. (2000) Reflection and the reflective practitioner unpublished lecture notes: OMNA Early Years Training Pascal, C., Bertram T., Gasper M., Mould C., Ramsden F., Saunders M. (2001) Research to Inform the Evaluation of the Early Excellence Centres Pilot Programme DfEE Research Report No 259 HMSO Rodd, J (1994) Leadership in Early Childhood: The Pathway to Professionalism, Buckingham: OUP. Schon D, (1991) The Reflective Practitioner: How Professionals Think In Action , Aldershot : Ashgate Publishing Schweinhart, L. J., Montie, J., Xiang, Z., Barnett, W. S., Belfield, C. R., & Nores, M. (2004). Lifetime effects: The High Scope Perry Preschool Study Through Age 40. Ypsilanti, MI: HighScope Press. Unit, London (document no. ITB2); available online from the Publications page of the Surestart website:http://www.surestart.gov.uk/publications.

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