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Unit 11 - Working in Health and Social care - SECTION B - SUBSECTION 2

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Introduction

Unit 11 health and social care Section A - introduction For my unit 11 coursework in health and social care I will be producing a report which will be based on two contrasting job roles in health care. I will talk about the jobs describing what they are and evaluating them in terms of sector, role and status. The two jobs I have chosen to do a report on will be a midwife and a care assistant. I will be carrying out research when evaluating on the above areas for both of my chosen jobs and interviewing the care assistant to get a more up close idea of their job role overall. Afterwards I will be evaluating my aptitudes to see if the job roles would be suitable for me and whether I would fit into that category. The reason I chose to write about a midwife for my job is because this I what career I hope to achieve in the future and figured it would be interesting to learn and write about. The reason I chose a care assistant however, was for the opposite reason as this is the job I would least like to do. I was however interested in their job roles and how they applied each sector to this. Job role 1 - Midwife Here I am going to be looking into the job of a midwife and the daily routine they follow within their job role. Sector: There are two sectors which any job could fall into; these are the statutory sector, also known as the public sector which includes health and educational services provided by the local government, and the independent sector. Funding from the statutory sector comes mainly from various forms of taxation; this includes income tax, national insurance and council tax (for those services provided by the local authorities). However, the income taken from council tax is not enough to fully fund those educational and social services so local authorities are provided with funding from central government like taxation. ...read more.

Middle

Midwifery Legislation - For any midwife this will be based on their ability to demonstrate that she/he has the required skills and abilities to practise the profession safely according to the national requirements. Midwifery legislation is the part of a nation's laws that relate to the profession and practice of midwifery. Midwifery regulation is the set of criteria and processes arising from the legislation that identifies who is a qualified midwife and who is not, and describes the scope of midwifery practice. Registration, sometimes called licensure, is the legal right to practise and to use the title of midwife. If an individual was to be employed by the NHS as a midwife who was not qualified to be a midwife this could cause serious complications as they do not have the skills they need to carry out the duties safely. The Midwifes' Act - this act regulates the profession of midwifery, requiring certification for midwives and providing a penalty for any woman practicing midwifery without certification, with the exception of legally qualified medical practitioners or those giving assistance in emergencies by the central midwives board which governs and trains midwives. Data Protection Act (1998) - This act defines UK law on the processing of data on identifiable living people. It is a legislation that governs the protection of personal data in the UK. There should be a paper record and a computer record of the information which should be accurate and up to date according to the person's right and kept secure. It should not however, be transferred to any other country without appropriate protection and allows the individual to access their personal data. The Medicine Order (1980) - This order states that medicine is not to be prescribed or sold or supplied by a certificated midwife unless a prescription is given before hand by a qualified practitioner. If a midwife was to prescribe drugs to a patient before they were qualified this could result in serious problems as the patient may be allergic to the medication or subjected not to take it for health reasons. ...read more.

Conclusion

care assistant as they may feel there was nothing they could do to prevent this from happening but there are however, positive outcomes for a care assistant by helping those who are vulnerable or frail with daily activities such as bathing, getting dressed/undressed etc and just generally making them feel happy and comfortable. This can make them feel that their job can be very rewarding at times. Autonomy: Care assistants may find that this is limited within their job as they are very much always working in a team or around other staff who may have higher status and power such as the supervisor or care manager, or even a nurse or practitioner. This may make a care assistant feel they have less job satisfaction because they don't have the choice to carry out activities on their own without gaining consent first from the manager/supervisor. They could however get a great deal of satisfaction out of this as they won't feel they are responsible for any serious problem that arises as they are only doing what they have been told such as: Mixing up medication Accidents Injuries Food and hygiene problems When out on day trips etc. If a resident does not wish to get dressed or receive any help from the care assistant, then the care assistant must obey this even if they do not agree because each resident has their own personal right within the care setting. Social factors: Social factors can bring out job satisfaction for some workers. Care assistants mix with many people within their job which can bring about new friendships or just general social contact for example not only will they be in contact with the residents they provide care for, but their family members also and this could bring about a close bond and a rewarding friendship. They may also come into contact with other health care practitioners like: GP's Nurses Physiotherapists Other managers from different care settings Pharmacists Chiropodists and many more. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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