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Analyze the view that US military intervention in Vietnam was more a necessity than a tragic error.

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Introduction

Gabby Tolkin-Rosen Analyze the view that US military intervention in Vietnam was ?more a necessity than a tragic error?. The view that US military intervention in Vietnam was ?more a necessity than a tragic error? is an orthodox standpoint, the view that US military intervention was necessary may have been perceived by the Americans at that time to be correct because of America?s policy of ?containment? and in addition to this, the prestige America invested into the war in Vietnam. However, the lack of benefit Vietnam offered America, America?s blurring of Russian communism and Vietnamese ?nationalism? as well as the extremely taxing effects of the war allow for the conclusion that military intervention in Vietnam was in fact, a tragic error. During the Vietnam War, America?s initial policy of ?limitation? proved unsuccessful, thus America?s role and consequently their military involvement increased dramatically in the area. The fact that this policy of limitation was adopted in the first place shows that Vietnam was at first not considered a necessity, however as America became more and more involved in the war, so did the importance of military intervention in Vietnam. The American?s perceived military intervention in Vietnam as necessary due to the American policy of ?containment?. ...read more.

Middle

In addition to this, Vietnam was seen as a test of America?s reliability as well as a chance to uphold its promise to protect all ?Free nations? of the world. Military intervention in Vietnam was further seen as necessary in fixing America?s reputation after its loss of China, this was seen as an opportunity for America not to make the same mistakes as they did in China, and therefore take a hardline approach in its dealings with Vietnam to assure they could not be blamed (due to lack of military involvement) for losing another Asian state to communism. Military involvement was further seen as necessary to the Americans as they underestimated the power of the Vietminh, due to this America held the belief that they would win the war because of their superiority in air and firepower, this confidence expressed in the speech that highlighted the belief that America was winning the war in Vietnam, through their approach of ?calculation? ,nspired the continuation of military involvement in Vietnam. In addition to this, military intervention was necessary because the Americans did not trust the South Vietnamese to do the job of safeguarding capitalist policy in Vietnam. ...read more.

Conclusion

The impotency of American military intervention affirms that military intervention was in fact a mistake; this is due to America?s misunderstanding of the context of the war and of the Vietcong and Vietminh. The blurring of Soviet communism with Asian nationalism by the Americans not only caused them to act in extremities but also disallowed them to take into consideration that the Vietminh were undeterred by all their efforts(such as their bombing raid) as they were fighting for a cause. The war and the military devotion of the Americans was deemed as an error because of its ultimate insignificance towards the outcome of the war as they did not know how to approach guerrilla warfare, and instead treated it as a conventional warfare case. Therefore, the US military intervention in Vietnam may have been seen by the Americans to be necessary in the containment of communism as well as in affirming Americas reputation as a leading power, however, US military intervention in Vietnam seem as a tragic error due to the extreme losses America suffered both economically and in casualties for a cause that held no true benefit for the Americans (natural recourse-wise). Furthermore, intervention was seen as an error due the lack of morale inspired in American soldiers and America?s misunderstanding of Vietnamese context. ...read more.

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