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How did the American settlers view "Manifest Destiny?" How did the Mexicans view it?

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Introduction

How did the American settlers view "Manifest Destiny?" How did the Mexicans view it? America in the 1830's was a proud nation whose citizens aspired for wealth and freedom. Religion played a predominant role in society and influenced the nation's values and ideologies. It was under these conditions that Americans became inspired to expand westward. Expansion was perceived as necessary for a number of reasons. Some claimed that spreading liberty and democracy was God's will. Others perceived the seizure of lands as historically inevitable; America was destined to dominate North America from the Atlantic to the Pacific. The term "Manifest Destiny" was not coined until 1945 when it was utilized as propaganda throughout America. ...read more.

Middle

Mexico became a victim of Manifest Destiny in the 1940's. American settlers moved into the Mexican territory, known today as Texas. These settlers anticipated the acquisition of Texas and planned to sell the land at high prices. While occupying the region these settlers caused many problems including the coercion of Mexicans farmers into forfeiting their land. President Tyler, in hopes of winning re-election, annexed Texas on the last day of his term without negotiating a treaty with Mexico. Mexicans viewed this act as blatant robbery and an act of injustice. Polk won the presidency with promises of acquiring both the California and Oregon territories. ...read more.

Conclusion

However, as the trickle turned into a flood Mexicans found themselves losing not only their land but also their privacy and liberties. Americans' claim to the right to this land engendered resentment in their Mexican hosts. Mexicans found themselves in danger of losing their land to the same guests they had previously welcomed into their homeland. Naturally, Mexicans became defensive in their actions with these arrogant foreigners and sought to reclaim what had been stolen from them. After the annexation of Texas Mexican concern turned to survival. As they witnessed the destructive path of the United States they could not help but fear their fate would parallel that of Native Americans. While Mexico did survive, its political relations with the United States remained strongly defensive for years to come. ...read more.

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