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Pros and Cons - The use of the Atomic Bomb.

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Introduction

Joshua Gendron Pros and Cons - The use of the Atomic Bomb There are a few pros and cons that go along with the use of the atomic bomb during wartime. Terrible atrocities against all of humanity must be dealt with and stopped. The worst crimes against humanity that hopefully will never be seen again, occurred during World War II. The security of our nation and of other allied nations was severely threatened, not only by the Germans, but also by the Japanese. The Japanese were a strong people willing to fight until it was no longer possible. It was even said that they were suicidal, with their kamikaze pilots and no real hope of defeating the allied nations. The United States has always placed a high value on American lives and human lives in general. In order to protect these lives and to insure that the world is safe for democracy, the United States Congress had to make a very difficult decision. ...read more.

Middle

Some estimates are as high as half a million, some lower but almost all of the estimates are well over one hundred thousand American lives that would have been lost. This number did not include the number of Japanese that would have also been killed. This combined number would have seriously outweighed the 200,000 who died at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. In order to prevent the countless number of American and Japanese lives from being lost in an invasion, America had to surprise and shock the Japanese into seeing how useless it was to persist and continue fighting in the war. The only way to do this was by using the atomic bomb. Using an atomic bomb showed the Japanese that a city could be destroyed in one fast blow, and that there was no possible way to prevent the city from being destroyed. After the ultimate destructive power of this weapon had been demonstrated, Japan had no choice but to surrender. ...read more.

Conclusion

Hostile nations such as Japan or Russia could have developed it before us with devastating effects. The United States would have been defenseless against these nations. The Iron Curtain would have taken on a whole new meaning if Russia possessed nuclear weapons and threatened to use them. The nuclear arms race was inevitable and was not sparked by the use of nuclear weapons against Japan. The decision made almost fifty-eight years ago to drop the atomic bombs on Japan will always be a controversial one. The life lost on those two days is unbelievable, but if we had invaded instead, the consequences would have been a lot more devastating. Thousands of Japanese lives were saved, not to mention the hundreds of thousands of American lives that were saved. In essence, the atomic bombs used in World War II against Japan did not only destroy lives, but it saved them. The use of nuclear weapons is in fact a horrible crime against humanity. But by committing this crime, if it can prevent worse crimes as committed by Japan and Germany in World War II, than that crime against humanity can somewhat be justified. ...read more.

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