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The causes of the English civil war.

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The causes of the English civil war In this essay I am going to explain why the civil war broke out in 1642. The English civil war broke out on 22nd August 1642. It caused many deaths and divided some families. There were many reasons for this, including religious arguments, financial arguments, the actions of Charles himself, all the causes were linked together, (Parliamentarian and Royalist) some of the events of 1642 and the demands made by parliaments for more power and also I am going to explain the long - term causes and the short - term causes also know as the triggers. There are many different reasons for the causes of the English civil war but first I will start with the religious disputes over archbishops Laud's reforms of the church. Reforms were introduced that made churches more decorated (like catholic churches) Charles I collected customs duties without parliaments permission, he married a French catholic who was unpopular with his people. The Bishops' Wars were fought between the Scots and English forces led by Charles I. These conflicts paved the way for the uprising of Parliament that began the English civil wars. ...read more.


This attempt failed, since they were spirited away before the king's troops arrived. Charles left London and both he and parliament began to stockpile military resources and recruit troops. Charles officially began the war by raising his standard at Nottingham in August, 1642. At this stage of the wars, parliament had no wish to kill the king. It was hoped that Charles could be reinstated as ruler, but with a more constructive attitude to parliament. Parliaments were supported by the richer South and East, including London. Parliament also held most of the ports, since the merchants that ran them saw more profit in a parliament-lead country. Parliament definitely had access to more resources than the king, and could collect taxes. Charles had to depend on donations from his supporters to fund his armies. The fourth cause was that Charles I ruled without parliament. Charles I dissolved parliament because of all the disputes and ruled without it for 11 years. King did not like the wealth, power or ideas of parliament. He began making the decisions about taxes without parliament. The fifth cause was that the ship money argument. ...read more.


In 1638, the Scots invaded England. King Charles asked parliament for money to raise an army. Parliament made King Charles agree to reforms in 1641. King Charles and archbishop laud made changes of the Church of England which were unpopular. The puritans were angry about the king's Catholic sympathies. These are shot - term causes and long - term causes, they are linked together between causes and how they lead to civil war. I think there were almost as many reasons for people to fight the civil war as there were people fighting. Briefly, however, the main reason for the war was the king Charles I and his various parliaments did not agree about anything - religion, how the country should be run, how England should behave towards other countries and so on. This was made worse by the fact that Charles I, believing that kings got their power from god and so could rule as they chose, made no attempt to keep his parliament happy. He spent eleven years ruling without parliament at all. When the long parliament, called in 1640, tried to make him change his ways and he refused, war broke out. (Some important things may not have set off the war, without the small triggers). Melroy Satkunarajah 8LCL ...read more.

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