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The structures of the Soviet State were created by Lenin and abused by Stalin. Discuss.

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Introduction

The moment Lenin had stepped into power, he was clear of his aims. Lenin had wanted a Proletariat Revolution, which had already been achieved, and then a Dictatorship of the Proletariat, in which he would rule on their behalf. As Marx had said in his writings that it was necessary to put down all opposition and put Communist reforms into place, Lenin's made it so that his government would have complete power and the people would not have any opportunity to decide if they wished to be controlled by other parties. Stalin was an enthusiastic defender of Lenin and the Marxist exiles who published the socialist paper Iskra. 1 Once he gained power after Lenin's death, he began to build up Russia as he said; "Other countries are 50 years ahead of Russia. We must make this up in 10 years".2 It was Stalin's belief that Russia was so far behind the rest of Europe that I they didn't "catch up and overtake these countries in the technical and economic sense (...) We [Russia] shall be crushed".3 Two of Stalin's main aims, therefore was for a centrally-planned economy called a "command economy" and a totalitarian system of government. ...read more.

Middle

level".15 While this was great for Russia, it was abandoned by Stalin in favour of his new Five-Year Plan. Referring back to Stalin's belief that Russia was so far behind the other countries in Europe, it was his hope that the introduction of the five-year plan would mean that the USSR's industrial base would reach the level of capitalist countries' in the West, to prevent them being beaten in another possible war. 16 Though many of the Bolsheviks were against the New Economic Policy as it was seen as a "betrayal of communist principles",17 Stalin's change of heart after the 'war scare' and his reasons behind the five-year plan helped to convince many of them that it was a great idea. Stalin's aim for the plan was for it to be "the transformation of the country from an agrarian into and industrial one, capable by its own means of producing the necessary equipment".18 Stalin had specific targets of output which workers were expected to achieve and because of Stalin's government backing and force, punishments would be doled out should any targets not be met. ...read more.

Conclusion

Lenin had a fundamental belief in eventual demise of the state and, however much Stalin presented himself as being Lenin's most loyal follower, in reality he destroyed much of Lenin's achievements26. 1 http://library.thinkquest.org/C0112205/stalinsrussia.html 2 http://library.thinkquest.org/C0112205/stalinsrussia.html 3 Five-Year Plan sheet 4 Methods of Nazis, Fascists and Bolsheviks - Gareth Jones. 5 Five-Year Plan sheet 6 Stalinist Russia - Steve Phillips 7 The Unknown Lenin - Richard Pipes 8 The Real Bolshevist - Stephen F. Cohen 9 www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/fearmongering 10 The Cheka: Lenin's Political Police - George Leggett 11 http://www.angloeuropean.essex.sch.uk/History/IB_Notes/lenin.htm 12 http://www.angloeuropean.essex.sch.uk/History/IB_Notes/lenin.htm 13 Revolution and Civil War in Russia - Elisabeth Gaynor Ellis 14 A History of Twentieth-Century Russia - Robert Service 15 A History of Twentieth-Century Russia - Robert Service 16 Revolution and Civil War in Russia - Elisabeth Gaynor Ellis 17 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Economic_Policy 18 Five-Year Plan sheet 19 http://library.thinkquest.org/C0112205/leninsrussia.html 20 The Unknown Lenin - Richard Pipes 21 Democracy and the Socialist Movement - John McAnulty 22 Stalinist Russia - Steve Phillips 23 The Making of the Soviet System - M. Lewin 24 The Making of the Soviet System - M. Lewin 25 The Making of the Soviet System - M. Lewin 26 Stalin: A Biography - Robert Service ?? ?? ?? ?? The structures of the Soviet State were created by Lenin and abused by Stalin. Discuss. ...read more.

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