• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Theatres of War

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Theatres of War Assessment Even though Britain were officially at war with Germany, neither land forces saw any action for several months. This was known as the Phoney War. Neither Hitler nor the allies made an attempt to attack each other. The German forces concentrated their efforts on the East and completed its invasion of Poland. The German army then began to concentrate their efforts towards France. Despite the fact that they were considered the greatest army in the world at the time they were very poor tactitionists and they basically planned to defend the country through the Maginot line and to wait for the enemy to advance. Ironically it was Napoleon that said that the best form of defence was attack. Although it was technologically brilliant, the Maginot line stopped about 250 miles short of the coast at the border of Belgium. The German army could march right through Belgium and into France. The Panzer divisions were greatly underestimated and so attacked through a thickly wooded area known as the Ardennes. Since the French could not begin to believe that any effective attack could be lead through such an area, it was poorly defended with it's oldest and least trained men stationed there, who were grossly outnumbered and outclassed. ...read more.

Middle

German bombing was during daytime and the limited range of the Messerschmidt meant that bombers were not protected all the way. Due to the fact that their own losses were too high, the Germans had to switch to night bombing, but the damage they caused was too indiscriminate to be militarily decisive. On September 17, 1940, Hitler postponed the invasion indefinitely, thereby conceding defeat in the Battle of Britain. This was effectively the beginning of the end for Hitler as this was the 1st time that Germany had been defeated and pushed back into their own territory. The entry of Italy into the war in June 1940 could have caused serious problems to Britain such as cutting of the supply route through the Mediterranean. They were in a position to threaten interests in the Suez Canal as well as a variety of bases such as Malta, and areas under British control such as Palestine and East Africa. Italy ended up to be not nearly as dangerous as they had potential to be due to the fact that the men were not interested and a result when it came to combat they did not do terribly well. ...read more.

Conclusion

The fact that they failed signified the beginning of the end and that Hitler had lost by air, by land and as well as by sea. The Battle of Stalingrad checked the German advance into Russia. In August 1942, the German Army under General von Paulus advanced into Stalingrad, becoming buried in months of bitter street fighting as they attempted to clear the city of Russian troops. In November, Romanian forces defending the German supply route to Stalingrad were routed by the Red Army, and the 200,000-strong German army was left besieged in Stalingrad. The Soviets launched a counter-offensive into the city. Hitler ordered Paulus to stand fast; having been assured by Goering that the Luftwaffe could keep the 6th Army adequately supplied by air. Hitler ordered Field Marshal Erich von Manstein to relieve Paulus. However, the Luftwaffe was only able to supply the 6th Army with a fraction of its requirements while the advance of Manstein's relief army was blocked by the Red Army. The Russians pushed on from three sides in January 1943, and von Paulus surrendered on January 31. The battle cost Germany about 200,000 troops. In the aftermath of Stalingrad, in part owing to the collapse of the Italian and Hungarian armies, the Germans were forced to retreat from the Caucasus and back approximately to the line from which they had started the 1942 summer offensive. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Modern European History, 1789-1945 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Modern European History, 1789-1945 essays

  1. Why was the Battle of Stalingrad a turning point in the war against ...

    Conclusion This battle in Stalingrad was a major turning point in the war. It was the beginning of a fundamental change to the advantage of all anti - fascist countries. Hitler was practically dead inside his spirit had left, he hated being defeated, especially since he hadn't felt that emotion

  2. British advances in technology won the battle of the Atlantic

    This and the breaking of the codes show's that the Germans had good technology and that the British at this time lacked the technology to deal with them. The U-boat design was also a very important role in the success of the U-Boats; this can be seen by them having good communication through radio and effective use of air cover.

  1. Hitlers Germany

    of honestly coming to terms with the crimes in which their Nazi leaders had implicated them. The problem then was one of identifying the guilty and punishing them. Twenty-one major Nazi leaders were tried before the Nuremberg tribunal, an Allied legal machine whose responsibility was to ferret out those who had committed war crimes and crimes against humanity.

  2. Vietnam war

    50 % population of RVN lost homes * 12 provincial capitals and 51 district capitals destroyed * Economy 40 years behind other south-east Asian countries * 30,000 children from Hanoi and Haiphong deaf from noise of bombs * 65,000 vietnamese assisted by Americans to escape in 1975 * 130,000 more

  1. The Battle of Britain

    from France. Also, General Riddell-Webster was talking about evacuation with the War Office, so in different circles, everyone was talking about a withdrawal from France, but, even by May 20th, no one seemed to be treating the matter with any great urgency.

  2. Does Source A adequately explain the reasons for German Surrender at Stalingrad?

    live for much longer: "So now you know that I am not coming back." This means that as he knows that he is going top doe soon, he does not have much to loose by telling the truth about what is actually going on in Russia.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work