• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
Page
  1. 1
    1
  2. 2
    2
  3. 3
    3
  4. 4
    4
  5. 5
    5
  6. 6
    6
  7. 7
    7
  8. 8
    8
  9. 9
    9
  10. 10
    10
  11. 11
    11
  12. 12
    12
  13. 13
    13
  14. 14
    14
  15. 15
    15
  16. 16
    16
  17. 17
    17
  18. 18
    18

Theodore Roosevelt

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Theodore Roosevelt suffered as a child because of his physical weakness, and learned to strengthen his body and fight back. This is the explanation given for his extremely powerful, unremitting personality. In fact, "manly" and "masterful" are two of the most common words in his writings, which reflects his desire to impose his views on others. This helped carry him through a strong presidency that, not surprisingly, had a clear imperial impulse.1 Roosevelt stated in his Autobiography that he "did and caused to be done many things not previously done by the president and the heads of the department. I did not usurp power, but I did greatly broaden the use of executive power."2 Roosevelt stood as the transition between the old presidency and the modern presidency. It was he who began to mold and expand the president's role in an international arena, as well as the president's role in the new world of big business and potent organized labor. Roosevelt's dynamic personality allowed him to utilize many prerogative powers, and get away with it. He was very successful in appealing to the American voters, and getting them to pressure their Congressmen to do what he wanted. Whenever he committed a questionable action, he escaped harmful criticism by making enthusiastic speeches filled with reasons of why his actions were morally and legally correct. Roosevelt believed that a good executive must take an active interest in getting the right kind of legislation passed - a belief that went hand in hand with his Stewardship Theory. He believed that a President should act for the public welfare in any way possible, for a president is a servant of the people. He argued that a president could take any action not expressly prohibited by the Constitution or legislation passed by Congress - a very expansive interpretation of the Constitution.3 Roosevelt used his presidency as a "bully pulpit." ...read more.

Middle

Roosevelt rarely consulted or confided in members of his Cabinet. Instead, he had a "Kitchen Cabinet" that consisted of unofficial advisers who met during mealtimes and discussed political issues. Roosevelt consulted these outsiders on everything from speeches, to such important issues as the taking of Panama. 17 This expanded Roosevelt's power, because these advisors were not subject to Congressional oversight, thereby lessening Congress's control over the president. When Roosevelt became President in 1901, the role of the United States in international affairs was confused. Roosevelt struggled with a Congress and voters who weren't concerned about foreign issues and wanted to remain isolationist. But as the US became more industrialized, as the economy and national power grew, Roosevelt, (although it was McKinley who started along this path), recognized the need for a change in attitude and policy. After all, by the time Roosevelt became president, the US had already grabbed colonies around the world - Cuba, Guam, Puerto Rico, and the Philippines, where the US army was engaged in a brutal war to subdue Filipino revolutionaries.18 Americans couldn't imagine their country as an active force in world affairs, and Roosevelt used the publicity available to a president to change that. Roosevelt was a great believer in imperial expansion. In 1904 he stated that US interests had been "served in more than one way by the possession of the Philippines."19 While he was the assistant secretary of the navy, he was a very vocal supporter for American involvement in the Cuban-Spanish War.20 He gave orders to attack the Spanish fleet in the Philippines without the authorization from his superior.21 When a desk job no longer satisfied him, he joined the Rough Riders and became famous for his exploits in the Spanish-American war. ...read more.

Conclusion

347. 4Roosevelt, Autobiography, p. 345. 5Roosevelt, Autobiography, p. 347. 6Roosevelt, Autobiography, p. 354. 7Brinkley, Alan and Dyer, Davis, ed, The Reader's Companion to the American Presidency, p. 296. 8Roosevelt, Autobiography, p. 352. 9Hofstadter, The American Political Tradition and the Men Who Made It, p. 285. 10Hofstadter, The American Political Tradition and the Men Who Made It, p. 289. 11Brinkley, Alan and Dyer, Davis, ed, The Reader's Companion to the American Presidency, p. 295. 12Hofstadter, The American Political Tradition and the Men Who Made It, p. 289-290. 13Brinkley, Alan and Dyer, Davis, ed, The Reader's Companion to the American Presidency, p. 296. 14Brinkley, Alan and Dyer, Davis, ed, The Reader's Companion to the American Presidency, p. 297. 15Corwin, The President: Office and Powers 1787-1957, p. 6. 16Corwin, The President: Office and Powers 1787-1957, p. 268. 17Corwin, The President: Office and Powers 1787-1957, p. 493. 18Brinkley, Alan and Dyer, Davis, ed, The Reader's Companion to the American Presidency, p. 300. 19Fisher, Presidential War Power, p. 45. 20Brinkley, Alan and Dyer, Davis, ed, The Reader's Companion to the American Presidency, p. 300. 21Hofstadter, The American Political Tradition and the Men Who Made It, p. 277. 22Brinkley, Alan and Dyer, Davis, ed, The Reader's Companion to the American Presidency, p. 301. 23Fisher, Presidential War Power, p. 47. 24Brinkley, Alan and Dyer, Davis, ed, The Reader's Companion to the American Presidency, p. 301. 25Roosevelt, Autobiography, p. 433. 26Brinkley, Alan and Dyer, Davis, ed, The Reader's Companion to the American Presidency, p. 300. 27Brinkley, Alan and Dyer, Davis, ed, The Reader's Companion to the American Presidency 28Brinkley, Alan and Dyer, Davis, ed, The Reader's Companion to the American Presidency, p. 302. 29Fisher, Presidential War Power, p. 48. 30Brinkley, Alan and Dyer, Davis, ed, The Reader's Companion to the American Presidency, p. 302. 31Brinkley, Alan and Dyer, Davis, ed, The Reader's Companion to the American Presidency, p. 302. ?? ?? ?? ?? -1- Theodore Roosevelt ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level History of the USA, 1840-1968 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level History of the USA, 1840-1968 essays

  1. Why was Theodore Roosevelt was essential to the progressive movement?How far do you agree?

    This then shows us that people were not in favor of what Roosevelt was doing as they felt threatened, that they had to obey him, and he wasn't making sensible decisions and did not listen to communities. We can understand that Roosevelt then further went on to create more reforms.

  2. Rosalia Vallejo. Prior to the Bear Flag Revolt, which occurred in 1846, Californio Women ...

    10 After Fremont's arrival and conquest of California, the perspective that Californio Women had of white males was severely tainted. Rosal´┐Ża Vallejo, who had previously admired and even married to a white man, now perceived these men as cruel, and full of greed.

  1. How important was President Roosevelt to the development of America imperialism in the years ...

    financially unstable as to be vulnerable to European control, the United States had the right to intervene. Roosevelt wanted to increase their own influence and remove all international influence. However, it was President William H. Taft that expanded the effort and aimed to increase the interests of the United States by encouraging the investment of U.S.

  2. How successful was Roosevelt in delivering relief, recovery and reform during the New Deal?

    These codes proved themselves ineffective: many small firms found it particularly difficult to follow some of these regulations, especially the minimum wage clauses. After passage of the act, unemployment rose to nearly 13 million. The South, especially, suffered severely from the minimum-wage provisions.

  1. How Important was Theodore Roosevelt to the development of US Imperialism 1900-1914

    Roosevelt returned from Cuba with this heroic warrior image he had craved and used it to his advantage by promoting his imperialist views and ideologies. By using his newly-found warrior image he had managed to transform public opinion by promoting imperialism as a ?masculine and ethical? ideology and owing to

  2. Assess the importance of the President in the expansion of the USA from 1815-1917

    led to a dispute between the white settlers and the Native Americans. This saw the State of Georgia fight for Indian removal because they wanted access to it and Jackson fully supported Georgia. This led to disputes between tribal leaders and the Georgian government, Elliot West says ?He (Jackson)

  1. Describe Wilsons Fourteen points, Why did Congress fail to ratify the Peace Settlement?

    One can perhaps say that the Fourteen Points probably prevented the terms from being far worse than they could have been. They served perhaps as a moral scale for the delegations at the peace conference. b) When Wilson returned in late 1919, the country had changed.

  2. Averting the Apocalypse: The Cuban Missile Crisis

    World countries to develop democratic forms of government through economic progress in order to resist communism. (Jones) Kennedy's problems with Fidel Castro and Cuba were already in place before he took office. By the time he was in office the Soviet Union and Cuba were in cahoots and major trading

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work