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What are your first impressions of Henry?

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Sana Javed What are your first impressions of Henry? The first impression of Henry is shown straight away in the chorus as he is described as being 'warlike', this gives the audience the impression that Henry is ready for war and almost was made to fight. The chorus then carries on to say that he shall 'assume the port of mars', This again shows us how much passion he has about war, as Mars is the god of war. Also how 'at this heels (leashed in like hounds)', this is showing how he is ready to be unleashed to the French and give all he has got; 'should Famine, Sword, and Fire crouch for employment', these personifications of death show how Henry is ready to attack like a 'hound'. In the first act Canterbury and Ely talk about Henry's past and how he's a changed man now, 'His hours filled up with riots, banquets, sports', but in the end he turned out well, even though they did not think he would, 'the courses of his youth promised it not'. ...read more.


This shows us as the audience that Henry is the ideal king figure and is very thoughtful. Henry also comes across as being straight forward and candid, he also wants honesty from his fellow people and he asks for honesty from the Arch Bishop, as he knows if he goes ahead with this war it will end in death and blood and he does not want this unless necessary. 'Whose right suits not in native colours with the truth For God doth know how many now in health Shall drop their blood in approbation' Henry comes across as being very considerate and thoughtful here as we can see how he cares about the life's which will be taken due to this war, therefore he wants to go about it in the right way with pure honesty. The language that he uses; 'drop their blood', also adds the effect of death, which makes Henry seem even more caring. When Henry is sent tennis balls by Dolphin, he is instantly angered as this have made a mockery out of his past, ...read more.


When Henry finds out that Scroop, Cambridge and Grey have betrayed him he deals with it in a clever and in a way, fair manner. Scroop talks of how they should punish anyone who commits a crime; 'let him be punished', but the King being kind and caring as he is lets him off as it was due to 'excess of wine'. This in a way is ironic as what Scroop has said will be used back on him. He and the others will be punished for Treason. As the scene carries on we are shown a sensitive side of Henry, 'I will weep for thee', he is genuinely hurt as Scroop was he very close friend, 'thou that didst bear the key of all my counsels', meaning that Scroop bared all 'key' to Henrys secrets and problems. He is very angry and uses a cumulative effect of words to portray them, 'ingrateful, savage, and inhuman creature'. This shows the audience how even though Henry is a compassionate king; he will not take disloyalty to him and his country in any way at all. ...read more.

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